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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 9:13 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 1:54 pm
Posts: 21
Hi

I took my Ds to see a tutor for the 11+. She said that my DS needed to know the whole curriculum thoroughly for year 5 and above year 6 before she would even start on the test papers.

Now I have started late and I doubt I can cram in the whole year 5 and 6 work of English and maths into 2 months ( if I am wrong plz correct me)

Could anyone please let me know if there are particular areas to focus on for English?

Ta


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 10:09 pm 
Depends where you are and type of exam set in your area. In our case it was creative essay writing and comprehension for the indies schools. Are you aiming for grammar selection?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 10:27 pm 
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Naga, you're in the same area as us, where all the grammars are super-selective. What year is your child in? (I've emailed my friend btw to ask for details of her tutor. I'll message you if she gets back to me.)

I'd make sure her spelling and punctuation are rock solid, and that she is comfortable answering fairly simple questions about a fairly difficult text. (E.g. a piece of Dickens or Shakespeare.) Get hold of 11+ test papers, and the Bond or similar papers for age 9&10 and 10& 11 as these will give a good indication of what she needs to know.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 7:19 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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Naga, how about some time off school to get through more? Only possible of course though if you can get annual leave or if you are not working, and it's a bit naughty.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2011 6:35 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 1:54 pm
Posts: 21
Hi

I am looking at WCGS, Wilsons, Tiffins and Sutton Grammer

My DS is in year 5

Any yes I am thinking of pulling him out of school for 2 days per week..I think thats my only option.

DS is very lazy with hsi spellings

Any advice to keep me sane is appreciated
!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:42 am 
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Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 12:06 pm
Posts: 2093
Location: Birmingham
I don't think it is 'naughty' to flexi-school, in fact it is becoming more and more common for a very wide variety of reasons. It can help to calm difficult children, develop a closer parental relationship, and can be particularly useful for children who are 'different' from the normal academic ability range of their class.
That is like saying it is 'naughty' to put your child in a top Indie Prep or buy lots of resources and books... as it confers some advantage educationally.

Unfortunately the reality for many state Primaries is that with the best will in the world, crowd-control, rather than individually stretching children, takes over the most part of the school day.
If parents have the time and wish to spend a day or two 1-1 with their child, why look down upon it?

The only advice I can give on spellings is that grammar has an 'a' not an 'e' before the r. Common mistake - I once saw a tuition centre advertising 'Grammer School tuition' on a large expensive banner :D

There are many spelling programs in book, CDROM, and Internet form to purchase - I would look at them and decide what works best for your child if this is a weakness.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 4:26 pm 
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Can anyone explain how flexi-schooling works legally? I can't see our school allowing my DC to take up two places in their school if I took them out two days a week. And if a headmaster's report is important in a school decision, poor attendance record would reflect very badly on the child, however bright. Is there a legal rubric for doing this - say 3 days per week at school, 2 at home? Our Head won't even allow a half day off to take children to a talk about science unless it is organised through the school as a mass outing.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 5:46 pm 
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I was wondering the same thing menagerie. I can't think that the school would approve the absence, as that is only done in extenuating circumstances, so then Naga could well get a visit from the Educational Welfare Officer at some point, as unapproved absence is basically truanting!

Absence from school doesn't only affect the absent child (who in this case Naga is obviously hoping to benefit) but the whole class is disrupted by a child who isn't around to keep up with what is going on. Our school has many problems with children whose attendance rates are poor and frequent absence triggers all sorts of child protection warnings.

How can the school tell the difference (on paper) between children who are kept home to hide their bruises and those who are kept home to revise for the 11+?! If you really think they need extra schooling that the school isn't providing I think you should either withdraw them to homeschool fulltime. Unfortunately, our state system is not set up for 'flexi-schooling' and your decision to do something like that will affect other children detrimentally, cause extra hassle for staff, governors and the council's education department, all of whom will end up getting involved if there is persistant unapproved absence.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 10:19 pm 
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Location: Birmingham
There's a lot of info on the web about flexi-schooling.

It does not count as absence, but is marked 'educated off-premises' on the register and the school continues to receive the same amount of funding. It is not regarded as absence.

The possible extra hassle for teachers is likely negated by the fact that the child is benefiting from a lot of attention (not necessarily all academic) on their days off, which is usually a good thing.

Flexi schooling can only be done at the Head's discretion, so it is their decision whether to allow it or not. They have to be satisfied that the child is receiving appropriate education 'off premises' on those days/times.

I have seen a few newspaper articles on it as it seems to offer a good half-way house between schooling and home-schooling, with some of the benefits of both. As for saying 'if you feel the school is not offering a good enough education, take them out full time', the reality is that no school will ever be perfect, and not all parents can afford to give 5 days a week to their child(ren). Most schools also offer vital practice in social skills and teamwork that a lone homeschooler will not get as easily.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 11:10 pm 
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Location: Not in a hole in the ground but in a land where once they dwelt-the Beormingas
Going off topic but you can read about flexi-schooling here:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/educa ... 76414.html

I know our primary head wouldn't allow it- it's full time school or home-school option only. :(

Perhaps um, have a separate thread about flexi-schooling? Has anyone else experienced it?


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