Go to navigation
It is currently Tue Dec 06, 2016 12:09 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Missing Word question
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:37 am
Posts: 408
Can someone help on the following cloze sentences, please? We are ok with "1" but unsure about "2". A choice of words was not provided.

As quick as a flash, my dad jumped < 1 > the water. He held Patsy’s head up to keep it < 2 > the water so that she could breathe.

1 should be "into"

2 should be "up of", but we have "out of". Which one could it be?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:36 pm
Posts: 719
"out of" should be the answer.

_________________
Having one child makes you a parent; having two you are a referee.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 6:24 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
Where does it say it should be "up of"? That would make a very strange phrase indeed. Was there a misprint on the paper?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 6:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:37 am
Posts: 408
mystery wrote:
Where does it say it should be "up of"? That would make a very strange phrase indeed. Was there a misprint on the paper?


It states "up of" in the answers.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 7:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
out of

could be up above , up out of, but not up of


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 4:38 pm
Posts: 109
Optimist wrote:
mystery wrote:
Where does it say it should be "up of"? That would make a very strange phrase indeed. Was there a misprint on the paper?


It states "up of" in the answers.


Then it's wrong. Out of is good. And it would be absurd were above not to be acceptable, given "keeping their head above water" is a popular idiom. "Up of" is simply wrong, and a swift look at the British National Corpus (see here to re-run my search) shows nothing using "up of the" in remotely that sense. It's not American, either (cf. "in back of").


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
My lap-top is making a mess-up of looking in the British National Corpus but I will look later as it sounds intriguing.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016