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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:17 pm 
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I am finding it difficult to find suitably challenging books with suitable content for a 9 year old (year 5). I recently had a note back from school asking me if I was aware of the content of the Cherub books he was reading. I was, which made me feel even worse! I have just picked up the Hunger Games trilogy on a whim in Costco and reading the back I think that perhaps I should hold onto them for a bit. Any thoughts?


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:22 pm 
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Personally I think that a nine year old is a bit young for the Hunger Games (I don't know the other). Not because it is particularly challenging (see the other Hunger Games thread on here :D ), but because of the content. My year 6 DS wants to read them, but has gone quiet for now and I think I will hold them in reserve for later. It will depend entirely on your child. Why don't you read it first? Then you can make an informed decision.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:46 pm 
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I think Scary Mum is right - if you have any doubts about a book you should read it yourself first. Many kids will be capable of reading books where the content may upset them - they may have pestered to be allowed to read it and then not want to admit they are disturbed by it or not quite understand it.


I used to read Red Cross First Aid books at that age :shock: :oops: - could have managed the odd fracture and epistaxis but the sections on emergency childbirth were.... disconcerting. Couldn't say much as they were mother's books and I would have been told off for reading them.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 2:46 pm 
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We do have Hunger Games and Cherub books (DS1) but DS2 (yr 5) hasn't read them

He has read some of the HIVE series which he really enjoyed and he assures me that there were no "rude" bits in them :lol: but I find it really hard to find books for him. He's not into myths and fantasy so that seems to rule out a large section of the bookshop; he loves animal stories but most of them seem to be aimed at a younger age group. He's currently reading My Family and Other Animals but after that we will be searching again!!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 3:00 pm 
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Location: Essex
DS2 who is in yr4 has enjoyed the Hunger Games books and the film; he doesn't seem at all distressed in terms of nightmares or the like, although I would worry if the general theme didn't make him sit back and reflect a bit.

He has also had a look at the Cherub series, but, according to DD, doesn't like them. Heave sigh of relief there, then :) However, DD herself (yr6) has read several but reports that only one so far has featured under-age "relationships"... (Originally typed another, three-letter, word here, but something edited it to "gender"! Frilly bloomers for table legs, anyone??)

(Note, however, that she is fully aware that it is "under-age" and therefore not something to be recommended).

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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 3:27 pm 
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I will confess that my DS (almost 10 ) has read a lot of Cherub and the Henderson Boys books in the past 2-3 months and is currently on Book 2 of the Hunger Games. I have read lots of other books to DS - lots of classics and most other age appropriate material. I originally bought the books for DD who is 11 but DS started to read them and was hooked- these are the first books that he has wanted to read for himself. I was concerned about some of the language and content but having discussed it with his teacher he seemed to think they would be ok and that he was mature enough.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 8:47 pm 
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I have a very similar situation - bought the books for my Yr7 DS, but before he got around to them my DD who is just 10 asked to read them (apparently two of her friends who are quite sensible girls had already read them). She coped fine, and is now on the second book. DS is having to wait til she finishes to get his hands on each copy :lol:

I was actually more worried about her seeing the film and went along myself first, but it wasn't anything like as scary/violent as had been suggested and she didn't have any problems with it either.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 3:45 pm 
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This is an interesting thread. My son chose Hunger Games from a book club we belong to and I ordered it, not knowing what the content was. He is 9 and I decided he was too young. They read Alex Rider which occasionally has gruesome stuff in it, and we've just read a Higson Young Bond which had a really graphic description of a decomposing body bursting all over the hero. But I read it to them and whizzed in a monotone through that bit which made them laugh at my reaction rather than focus on the content. Not sure reading Hunger Games alone last thing at night is conducive to good sleep for a 9 year old. But they're all different. If he's unfazed and enthusiastic, I'd be tempted to skim read it myself first, to be able to discuss it and put the more grisly bits in perspective.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 4:46 pm 
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I'm all for discussing the moral issues raised by fiction books but a meaningful discussion needs opposing but possibly valid viewpoints. A discussion about whether it is desirable to mug old ladies would not therefore be very useful. This book seems to me to fall into a category where there is nothing to be gained by anyone considering the moral issues surrounding the plot and as it is unequivocally unpleasant there is therefore no point at all in reading it.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:32 pm 
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Location: Herts
I would like to discuss why the Hunger Games has captured the imagination of so many young people. Librarians are reporting that children are coming in who have never been inside the library before, just to borrow the series. This has to be a good thing. What is it about this theme that captivates them so? I thought the film was very powerful and will go and see it again as I know I will see more in it the second time around. My dd has read the series and seen the film three times. She has never in her life seen a film even twice. She is a very serious academic student but there is something about the Hunger Games that really draws her. She has read the Roman Mysteries so we had experienced a little of the concept in the Gladiators from Capua. There are many moral issues, the sister stepping forward to almost certain death to save her sibling, the same character risking death to save her team mate, the audiences watching it all on giant screens. It cannot be described as relentlessly unpleasant. It has a very uncomfortable plot but the characters follows strong moral issues. I think we need to try and understand why our children are so struck by it. Any ideas. DG


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