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PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 9:23 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 3:46 pm
Posts: 135
Location: slough
My DS is October born and looks like he should get atleast 72 out of 80 to get 121 passmark to get qualified for Burnham grammar school/Bucks schools

Any idea what is the case with Slough schools, should he be getting 90% in VR and NVR to get 111 pass mark or is it in the range of 85-90%

Any idea what is the case with Tiffin boys school, should he be getting 90% in VR and NVR to get pass mark or probably higher, I heard Tiffin paper is tougher than slough papers.

Thanks for the help


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 11:20 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 3:46 pm
Posts: 135
Location: slough
muvvalac wrote:
My DS is October born and looks like he should get atleast 72 out of 80 to get 121 passmark to get qualified for Burnham grammar school/Bucks schools

Any idea what is the case with Slough schools, should he be getting 90% in VR and NVR to get 111 pass mark or is it in the range of 85-90%

Any idea what is the case with Tiffin boys school, should he be getting 90% in VR and NVR to get pass mark or probably higher, I heard Tiffin paper is tougher than slough papers.

Thanks for the help



Any one has any updates on this please


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 2:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:49 pm
Posts: 1647
Location: berkshire
Hi,

Try doing a 'search' on some key words (ie the words slough & percentage together) in the Berkshire forum.
Have a scan throgh the posts listed... they may give you some idea of the percentage.

One of the posts that was listed (Nov 2007)had this to say...

I have no idea of a percentage that is needed.......but the Langley exam result is the standardised marks of each paper added together then divided by three. This means that you can make up for a 'weak' paper by being stronger in another.

A parent posted (last year) that their child was scoring 85%- 93% on NFER practise papers, Dec birthday and achieved a score of 126 in the Slough Consortium exam. Langley has historically offered down to 119 in the first allocations....and then down to 115/116 before closing.

This may give you an idea of the percentage that you need.


also this thead...

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=3680&p=38011&hilit=slough+percentage+practice+111#p38011


Obviously the format has changed (Maths has been dropped so only 2 papers) but it does give you some idea.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 10:30 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 3:46 pm
Posts: 135
Location: slough
makes sense.

If bucks needs around 90% to get 121, then probably Slough schools should need around 80-85% to get 111 to 118

Phew, some relief

I guess same with Tiffin boys where they may need 90-95% answers to be correct


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 12:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 6:36 am
Posts: 38
Location: Berkshire
http://www.nfer.ac.uk/nfer/research/ass ... scores.cfm

Hi Muvvalac - we used info on the Nfer website which helped us know what percentage and the equivalent in standarisd score that our DD had to get to pass her 11+ exams. Hope you find it useful.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:30 pm
Posts: 126
Hi

It all depends on the ability of the cohort taking the exam. This will affect the standard deviation value of all the scores. This figure varies from year to year. The standard deviation is compiled statistically by finding the mean value of all the cohort scores and then using a statistical formula to find the standard deviation. Once the standard deviation is found then another formula is used to find standardised score.

S = 15(b — a)/sd + 100
b is your child raw score
a is the mean average score
sd is standard deviation
Let's assume that standard deviation of all bucks school last year was 10.2.

Assume your child scored 72 out of 80 and the average score for the cohort was 57.Then to get your child score all you have to do is substitute in the formula above.

S = 15(73 — 57)/10.2 + 100 = 123
123 will be the score but not adjusted to age, which of course is even more complicated. To standardise for age your child will only be compared with his peer group for performance. So lets assume all 10 year old all performed very well, then they will be no points added.

Assume your child raw score is 73, which is 91 %, and the average raw score was 62, which is 73 %. Your standardised score will be lower.

S = 15(73 —62)/10.2 + 100 = 116

you can see from both calculations taht your child score can vary if the mean changes.on both examples he performed well scoring 91%., but his standarised score varied due to the shift in the average score. If the cohort is a very bright bunch, then the mean will rise which will suppress the standardised scores of all the cohert.

Assume you child gets a full raw score. He or she will not be able to achieve the maximum 141. His standardised score will be 126. of cource this will never happen as the average score will never be as high.

S = 15(80—62)/10.2 + 100 = 126

You will never be able to answer your question very accurately as the formula has two dependent variable which varies from year to year and hugely depends on the ability of the cohort.
Slough consortium usually produces a lower mean value to Tiffin’s due the different abilities of the cohorts.


I hope this explains it.

_________________
stressedparent


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 4:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 3:46 pm
Posts: 135
Location: slough
stressedparent wrote:
Hi

It all depends on the ability of the cohort taking the exam. This will affect the standard deviation value of all the scores. This figure varies from year to year. The standard deviation is compiled statistically by finding the mean value of all the cohort scores and then using a statistical formula to find the standard deviation. Once the standard deviation is found then another formula is used to find standardised score.

S = 15(b — a)/sd + 100
b is your child raw score
a is the mean average score
sd is standard deviation
Let's assume that standard deviation of all bucks school last year was 10.2.

Assume your child scored 72 out of 80 and the average score for the cohort was 57.Then to get your child score all you have to do is substitute in the formula above.

S = 15(73 — 57)/10.2 + 100 = 123
123 will be the score but not adjusted to age, which of course is even more complicated. To standardise for age your child will only be compared with his peer group for performance. So lets assume all 10 year old all performed very well, then they will be no points added.

Assume your child raw score is 73, which is 91 %, and the average raw score was 62, which is 73 %. Your standardised score will be lower.

S = 15(73 —62)/10.2 + 100 = 116

you can see from both calculations taht your child score can vary if the mean changes.on both examples he performed well scoring 91%., but his standarised score varied due to the shift in the average score. If the cohort is a very bright bunch, then the mean will rise which will suppress the standardised scores of all the cohert.

Assume you child gets a full raw score. He or she will not be able to achieve the maximum 141. His standardised score will be 126. of cource this will never happen as the average score will never be as high.

S = 15(80—62)/10.2 + 100 = 126

You will never be able to answer your question very accurately as the formula has two dependent variable which varies from year to year and hugely depends on the ability of the cohort.
Slough consortium usually produces a lower mean value to Tiffin’s due the different abilities of the cohorts.


I hope this explains it.



Yes, sure thanks . this helps

I appreciate that it depends on cohert but still it is good to have an rough idea


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 4:37 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:19 am
Posts: 294
When you say 90-95% needed for Tiffin Boys, if the paper has 80 questions then I think that's quite a broad margin of error - 5% = 6 questions.
Do the schools you're interested in use standardised scores or age standardised scores? This makes a difference to the calculations. Stressedparent's examples show standardised scores. The nfer website states:
Quote:
However, in order to allow for the differing ages of the pupils as accurately and as fairly as possible across the complete score range, the age-standardised scores are calculated in a much more statistically complex way, although the effect is similar to computing sets of scores using the above equation for pupils of the same age (to the nearest month).

(The above equation referred to is the one in stressedparent's post.) As stressedparent says, it depends on the cohort for each test. So in order to get the age st'd results you would need to know each child's score and also their month of birth. This is why no one can say that x% is a definite st'd score but that x% represents an approximation/guide to the scores you need to achieve.
Hope this has not muddied the waters further... :?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 11:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 3:35 pm
Posts: 22
Location: Surrey
I don't think DS needs to score as highly as 90-95% for a Tiffin pass, our tutor says 'aim for 85%' but I worked out that this year approx. 83% = pass.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 9:47 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:34 pm
Posts: 548
My ds guessed 18 questions in his Tiffin NVR, and he passed with a score of 238, comprising 115 NVR and 123 VR.

That's not 95%.

I know someone who didnt even pass, which means he got below the lowest qualifying score - 226. But he got in, and is enjoying Tiffins.

It still befuddles me, but hey, I'm not complaining.


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