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 Post subject: Grammar or Local
PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 11:53 am 
My daughter sat the Kendrick exam, were now panicking re results, i listed 2nd and 3rd choices as local comps if she didnt get in but am now worried that they wont challenge her enough!, could i apply for schlorships or is it all too late! help please! also are there any parents who could recommend a comp - reading area which challenges children, was thinking of langtree - but not too sure? :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 12:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 8:49 am
Posts: 145
Did you mean scholarship exams for Independent schools? If so, then I'm afraid the schools I'm aware of has already finished these scholarship exams, and their Common Entrance Exams as well in Jan. But still if these independent schools have vacancies (they generally do have), they do arrange seperate exams for individuals. So you can always try and talk to the schools.
I'm not sure which area of Reading you are from, there are two Comp. Sec. schools I feel are good, one is Maiden Earley in Wokingham and other is Little Heath in Tilehurst, West Birkshire. I personally doesn't like any of the Comp. Sec. school in Reading........

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 8:29 pm 
Hi
Just thought i would add this to put your mind at rest. My neighbours daughter was always top of the class and tried for Kendrick but, due to a bad cold on the day, did not get in. Her two best mates did get in. The interesting thing is what the resulst are 8 years down the line. My neighbours daughter went to the local comp and had a great time, really getting into the bands and mixed social life. She was in a streamed group and achieved 11 A* at GCSE and 4 As at A level and is about to go to Oxford to do maths. As for her friends, one had a miserable time as she was coached for 2 years for the exam and found it vvery tough going so had extra work etc. She left as soon as possible. Other friend enjoyed Kendrick but didnt get any where near as good results.
So, my point, a bright child with supportative paraents and good self esteem will do well anywhere (there are always challenges - even if this means reading and finding them for yourself - I dont think a bright child is ever bored - there are always things to think about). On the other hand, a pushed child can really feel miserable at a high performing grammar like Kendrick.
In the end they will do what they do wherever !


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 9:04 pm 
Quote:
a bright child with supportive parents and good self esteem will do well anywhere


Quite agree!!

But can't help thinking, what if the child feels they need to 'dumb down', in order to be accepted by the majority of their class mates at secondary?
As most teenagers usually go through a myriad of emotional states, even if they appear focused, peer pressure can be quite a major influence.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 9:48 pm 
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But can't help thinking, what if the child feels they need to 'dumb down', in order to be accepted by the majority of their class mates at secondary?


I am currently going through this will a year 8 child and its very traumatic for us. Much does however depend upon the child.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 11:50 pm 
Hi
Completely agree about it depending on the child. The girl in question was very balanced. Also think this is one of those things we, as parents, cannot always blame ourselves for (although of course we will!). I have 4 children all with differnt levels of sticking wth thier own morals/beliefs and going with the crowd. I think we can see the children/adolescents that are fitting in with mates and look at the parents and thier is no reason why !
Have to say I did it - completly dumbed down, lost my "posh" accent and enjoyed a very seedy teenage lfe. Came out of it at sixth form, did really well at A levels and went to very good univeristy etc etc.
Actually thoroughly enjoyed the dumb sleazy side for a bit but it must have been **** for my parents. The fab thing about being bright is that you can opt out for a while and easily opt back in.
never going to be easy is it ? why did we have them ??
Karin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 9:39 am 
Quote:
Have to say I did it - completly dumbed down, lost my "posh" accent and enjoyed a very seedy teenage lfe. Came out of it at sixth form, did really well at A levels and went to very good univeristy etc etc.


Thanks for that Karin. Its nice to know there is possibly light at the end of the tunnel. My child (who is popular - voted class rep on school council, good at sport, bright academically etc) has decided to join the 'naughty' children in his class because it looks like 'fun'. Fortunately the head of year has picked up on the slipping grades and has had a long talk with him about 'the future being in his hands', 'shouldn't waste his talents' etc which has had some impact on behaviour and effort put into his work although I have discovered that as soon as I take my eye off the ball he slips again. I suppose its all part of growing up and this is normal teenage behaviour but its tough on us parents and yes I like to think we are nice middle class people who want our son the be successful.


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