Go to navigation
It is currently Sat Dec 10, 2016 10:26 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 64 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 12:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:39 pm
Posts: 29
Hi :)

I'm new to this forum and I'm interested to hear from parents of girls currently at Kendrick.

My perception of the school is that it is trying to emulate an independent school environment, simply without the fees attached, and that most of the girls who attend would be attending independent schools if they hadn't gotten into Kendrick, rather than their local comps.

What are peoples' thoughts?

Lucy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 1:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4025
Location: Reading
Hi,
My DD is in year 8 and I don't think that's the case that most would be at an indie if they weren't at Kendrick. Obviously there will be a few.

Not sure what you mean about emulating the indie school environment though.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 1:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 1:23 pm
Posts: 83
What makes you think that Kendrick is trying to "emulate" an independent school? In what way? We have no experience of the independent sector, so I'm curious.

Our DD is in yr 7 and although a small minority of her classmates have come from the independent sector, it seems to have no real bearing now. The only thing she has noticed is that some girls (not necessarily those from a private primary school) have a bit more knowledge in one area or another, or might have done some science experiments before - but this year they seem to be intent on establishing baselines and levelling the field for all the girls across the year group regardless of from where they came.

There are many private schools around Reading (it is a relatively affluent area) - so it wouldn't surprise me that one of those would be the alternative for many families, not just for those whose kids didn't get into the grammar schools.

They're very keen on the house system - does that make them indie - like?? :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 1:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:39 pm
Posts: 29
Thanks for your replies. I'm not entirely sure what I am asking, tbh!

My DS goes to local comp and although there are a wide range of activities available, if a DC is not interested, there is no pressure to join clubs or develop additional hobbies/interests. If you want to just do your work and pass exams well but no more, that's perfectly acceptable.

My sense (and I don't know where this comes from) is that Kendrick wants more than high academic achievements from its girls, e.g. a musical talent or artistic leanings or something, which is not generally a focus of comprehensives as far as I can tell.

By 'emulating', I suppose this extra focus is what I associate with independent schools - they feel they offer 'added-value' and in addition to smaller class sizes/better facilities (not in all cases, I'm sure) they promote a wide range of extra-curricula activities to produce 'well-rounded' children.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 2:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 1:23 pm
Posts: 83
There are quite a few clubs available to the girls - I don't know how that compares with other secondary schools, private or state. It is fun for the girls to involve themselves, but I just assumed that that is because (compared with our primary) there is just simply more people therefore more opportunities.

Mine has not felt pressured by the school to join or do anything extra curricular - only by me! Although saying that, the "scary" sixth former house captain does a great job of rounding up yr 7s to encourage them to participate in house events: not a bad thing IMHO, it engenders a good feeling of inclusivity and belonging, especially in this first year.

Re smaller class sizes, there are 32!! in a class for many subjects, 24 in practical subject classes. And the facilities... not bad, but then I've not seen what the local indies have to offer to compare. Probably about the same compared to the local comps we looked at (our alternatives), but just less because the site is smaller and the number on roll is lower.

Have you a DD also? Are you / she considering Kendrick? As Ms K said on the radio last week, local kids should definitely try for a place.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 3:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:39 pm
Posts: 29
Thanks for your comments. I think what I am asking is, can you 'just' turn up to lessons & work hard, but not have to do extra-curricular if you don't want to? When DS considered Reading Boys' it was this element that put him off.

Yes I do have a DD, she wanted to try for Kendrick (without being very sure as to why) so we let her sit the test, now based on FOI posts it seems she might get an offer and I'm a bit flummoxed as it wasn't what I was expecting!

My only knowledge of Kendrick is from 25 years ago and not a reliable source as I did not enjoy it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 3:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4025
Location: Reading
There's a range of clubs and yes girls are encouraged to join them. However this is because they dont want girls to concentrate purely on academic work .

DD does book club and that is all. She hasn't been pressured to do anything else at school.
She does do dance, riding and piano outside school, and is keen on photography. She hopes the photography club will be running again next year as it was only open to years 9 and above.

Most importantly, to both DD and me, is that she is very happy there. I recently broached the subject of changing school at sixth form if Kendrick didn't do the subjects she wanted. She was horrified at the idea. She has several close friends, they socialise outside school too. (Don't believe the rumours that they don't!)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 10:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:44 am
Posts: 1390
Location: Reading
My DD (yr 8) didn't join many clubs in yr 7 but has got into the swing of it more this year. She now does badminton, hockey and football. Sport in general at Kendrick has been an eye-opener for us. My DD was at an Indie before and has never been sporty, or even interested in sport. She is now enjoying several sports immensely - maybe because the overall standard is lower?
There seems to be more 'pressure' on her to join the music clubs rather than the sport ones. Concert band was started but DD didn't stick with it as lugging a saxophone in more than 1 day a week (on foot) was just too much - that didn't seem to go down that well with the organisers. The sports clubs seem to be more welcoming (and grateful?).
It seems to be very much about doing something other than just academic learning. DD does piano, windband and Stagecoach out of school so I feel she is getting a really good range now with the addition of the sports clubs.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 11:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:39 pm
Posts: 29
Thanks Reading Mum for your thoughts. My DD is neither sporty nor musical, though I think she would enjoy a dance club. It was the only one on the list of clubs she was interested in. She doesn't play an instrument so that's music out the window!

When I attended grammar school it was much like the comps of the day in that a few clubs were offered but no pressure whatsoever to join them, as long as you did your homework that was enough.

Fast forward 25 years... My DS' comp offers many more lunchtime and after school activities than in my day but still there is no pressure to join in, and if you want to just turn up, do your lessons, then go home to chill out, that is acceptable as long as homework done on time. I perceive that Indie schools do heavily encourage joining in non-academic activities as this is where much of their added-value (resources, quality of facilities) can outperform state schools, and they pride themselves on producing 'well-rounded children' (again my perception). My further perception is that grammars are trying to emulate this element of Indie schools to attract the brightest students.

However I have two DC who want to simply go to school, come home, do homework and watch the Simpsons or hang out with friends. I'm quite happy with this (personal choice). Just wondering if she might feel pressure from the school?

I should add, we didn't attend the open days/evenings so don't know what the party line is.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 12:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:44 am
Posts: 1390
Location: Reading
I don't think there would be pressure in that scenario. Some girls are constrained by travel timetables etc. The lunch break is very short so any lunchtime clubs are pretty rushed.

I think the 'well rounded' line is often used now as a response to criticism in the past that Kendrick was a high pressure academic hot house. That is not the school I see today (through my DD's eyes).

My DD is very happy, has lovely friends and joins what she feels like joining. On non sports club days she stays in the library with friends till 4:30 and they do their homework together. After the first Christmas concert we have only been back to school once in an evening for any sort of showcase/performance/whatever and that was because her house won 'house dance' or something like that.

I went to a girls grammar in the 70s/80s and don't remember there being any clubs on offer - but then I was not sporty and from 5th form had to travel by coach after a house move.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 64 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016