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PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 2:41 pm 
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I know both of these 11 pluses are set by CEM / University of Durham. Could anyone please let me know the similarities and differences between the two?

My first choice is Warwickshire (Alcester) and we have been doing various Maths, English, VR and NVR papers and exercises. Alcester is 1st choice because it is much easier to get DD there each day, rather than KECH which would involve an extremely early start. However she is going to sit the KECH 11+ anyway, we will look into the travel problem if it comes to it, and I want to make sure that DD is as prepared as she can be for both of these.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2009 6:24 pm 
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If this has previously been asked does anyone know the name of the thread?

I really want to know once I have covered comprehension and cloze for Warks if there is anything different to be expected on the KECH test. e.g. are they required to write anything.

Thanks

Rose Petal


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 Post subject: kech test
PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2009 7:17 pm 
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Rose Petal

If you have a look at Fm's previous postings, she has covered what appears in the KE tests.

In answer to your question - the KE test has no writing element. It covers the following :

- Simple Maths
- Problem Maths
- 2 comprehensions
- A cloze exercise (fill in missing words in a passage)
- Vocabulary tests
- NVR tests


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 7:46 pm 
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Za1.


Thanks for the reply


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 10:35 pm 
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I was told by DS tutor that there was hardly any comprehension....maybe just one passage. Could you elaborate on that...

Oh and I always thought Fm was a man :oops: don't ask me why!!!! :shock:

FTM


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 11:59 pm 
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firsttimermum wrote:
...

Oh and I always thought Fm was a man :oops: don't ask me why!!!! :shock:

FTM


Don't worry - we've had lots of suprises over people's gender - it is down to the funny names we sometimes use

Love Herman ... with the great big bolts through her neck!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 9:03 am 
There were 2 comprehensions last year (though not very long ones).
Also, the cloze test in Bham kegs is different to Warwickshire in as much as there are no 'choices'. Pupils have to work out the missing word themselves and then endeavour to spell it correctly.My ds found this v difficult!


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 9:37 am 
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Hi Shana,

Really, as the time comes nearer I am panicking!!!I am actually losing sleep over this! What kind of words were there in the cloze tests...do you remeber any of the difficult words....so I can get an idea of the level of difficulty....thankyou!

FTM


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 11:55 am 
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Location: Birmingham
Hi firsttimermum and um

You need to careful not to read too much into what topics were in the B/Ham KE and Warks exams.

The Univ of Durham CEM goes to great lengths to vary the question types from year to year in an attempt to try to make these Tutor Proof. For this reason I always recommend that parents use as large a variety of test papers and material as possible in order to get their children prepared for the shock of the unexpected.

The other point you need to bear in mind is that the vocabularly required (or expected) for the KE exams is based on a reading age of about age 14-15 and NOT Key Stage 2. So just using only KS2 material is not a good idea. You need to develop their vocabularly beyond this and make sure they really understand the meaning.

Finally you need to train them not to panic if they miss out a lot of questions. There are a number of false myths about the pass raw pass marks required for both the KE B/Ham and Warks tests. Due to the difficultly of the tests and time contraints these are nowhere near the 90%+ raw scores requires for other NFER type exam in the rest of the country. Probably in the 70%-80% than 80%-90% so they can miss out a few questions.

I've found a old posting which give details of the KE Exam a few years ago to give you an idea of the content:-

Quote:
Hi all,

My son also did the KEG exam and found some of it very difficult.
I know what it feels like as a parent trying to prepare your child for an exam which we know very little about.
Anyhow, subject to criticism, (he's only ten), he gave me a run down of what appeared on that day:

Paper one:

Vocab:
Started off with about 38 synonyms. Children had to find the syns from a choice of four. Some of the words include devoured, commence, tranquil, nursery-man, nauseous, innovation.

Following this was a similar exercise but with 20 antonyms.
E.g find the opposite of asleep from dormant, awake, naughty and shy. Haste - hurry, slow, snail pace and pot.

Problems Maths then followed with 15 q's with sub divisions. E.g a graph with a table to do with rainfall. A typical q was how much rain falls in mm in Jan? In which month does --- mm of rainfall fall?
Problem maths also included percentages -increase and decrease, fractions and values. E.g. how many fifths are there in 10? In 2.8?

Hexagons refers to NVR and was the last section on paper 1. Some similar to what they gave on the sample sheet and some quite difficult. About 18 q's to do in 12 mins.

Kids have a break for 15 mins and then plunge into paper 2.

Paper 2

Comprehension:

There were two passages (fiction and non-fiction).
The fictional passage came first- a story about a Druid in search for a magical fish of knowledge.
The non-fictional text followed and was about Barcelona and buildings built. Kids had to answer about 26/27 questions about the text.

The 'missing words' section came next and included three passages about a Gaul / Viking. Very difficult, my son only completed 2/3's of it.

Quick Maths section came next, includes comparing fractions, rounding numbers, lots and lots of algebra, finding out which equations are true.

NVR: Blocks was the final section on paper 2 about 24 q's to do in 8 mins. 5 blocks given at the top of page and they had to identify it's correct 3d arrangement as the choice of blocks shown were rotated and flipped. Multiple choice.


I have also an example of a cloze test (of the type used in Warks)

Quote:
Cloze Test – Example 1
The members of a living community exist together in a particular, balanced relationship or ecosystem. One animal species eats another animal species which 1.(in turn ,by turns, therefore, thereafter) eats another.
Over years, a balance is worked 2.(at, out, up ,on) among the plants and animals which remains basically stable. It's like a huge puzzle with all the pieces in their proper places.3. (Anyway, However, Consequently, For example), at times this balance in nature is disturbed, resulting in possibly unforeseen effects.
Perhaps a disease results in the near 4. (disintegration, extermination, extinction, disappearance) of one species, leaving another species with no natural control. Sometimes, however, human beings 5.(interrupt, intervene, interact, intersect) in a natural environment, perhaps with good intentions, 6.(despite, although, but, so as) the result is the same.
7.(In addition, Moreover, By contrast, For example), this occurred in the Antilles in the 1870s. Sugar cane was a major crop there, but rats were eating it causing a great deal of damage. The mongoose, a mammal of the East Indies, was 8.(famous, reported, known, conceived) to be an excellent rat hunter. Several males and females were imported in 1872, and laws were established that forbade the killing of them or their offspring. After 10 years, it had multiplied abundantly, reducing the rat population. Consequently, damage to sugar cane was greatly reduced.
The influence of the mongoose, however, did not stop there. As the rat population decreased, the mongoose 9.(wanted, needed, claimed, threatened) to enlarge its menu and became a terrible pest. All of the 10.(indigenous, ingenious, ingenuous, innate) animals suffered. Now, it was specifically these animals that kept the local insect population in check.
Answers – Circle the correct answer
1. (a), (b), (c), (d)
2. (a), (b), (c), (d)
3. (a), (b), (c), (d)
4. (a), (b), (c), (d)
5. (a), (b), (c), (d)
6. (a), (b), (c), (d)
7. (a), (b), (c), (d)
8. (a), (b), (c), (d)
9. (a), (b), (c), (d)
10. (a), (b), (c), (d)


Hope this helps


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 5:56 pm 
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Thanks KenR the info was great and a real eye-opener!!

You're right its just that there is so many papers out there and not much time left, I want to make the most out of it. I know NFER and Bond are essential, but there are so many other papers like-IPS, learning together,Atheys, tutors etc.. Shall we just plunge through as many as we can???

Sorry but I am so confused because some posts indicate that some papers are totally irrelevant :shock: So what is the best route to follow for Birmingham KECH??

OMG!!The cloze test was tough! (well I think so for an 1 year old :? )


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