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 Post subject: Should I bother
PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 11:43 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:18 pm
Posts: 88
Hello once more!
Having been through this horrible experince once before I really am NOT looking forward to this.
I have a DD in yr8 at KEFW and my youngest is sitting the test in Nov.
She is an able girl and consistantly gets verbal and non-verbal work much higher than her sister did (and she is an august baby) but is sooooo unconfident about maths which was one of her sisters strong points.
I feel that she really would not struggle in a selective school but should I bother!?!?!?
- can you tell she hates practicing?!?!? :shock: :evil:


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 11:52 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8113
Hello Confusedmom!

Selective schools, though require a high standard to get in, cannot expect everyone to be clones - ie good at everything, it would be a boring place if that was the case.

I was at KEHS ahem decades ago, some girls were good at maths and others used to turn green at the thought ( I suppose it was relative - they were all good enough, just some rather better). I managed the maths and science fine - but Latin and French .... :twisted: :oops: :cry: yes well I managed enough to get by (and a C in O level Latin!) - but couldn't wait to dump them after Upper 5th.
When it comes to A levels - pupils do science or arts or languages etc (generally) - each to their own...!

I doubt of your DD, if she can do the VR and NVR will struggle with maths at school so much that it causes mega problems - maybe a little :? but not too much....


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 01, 2009 3:43 pm
Posts: 523
Location: Twells
I had the same worries as you, my DD has always found maths her weakest subject but she did well in her 11+ (maths predictablty her lowest score) and now she is at GS year 8 and has just been streamed for maths and is coping really well in the group she is in.
I have noticed that for the first time in years she is not worrying or feeling insecure about it, because everyone in her set is at the same level and the teacher is going at a suitable pace for them.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 10:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 9:51 pm
Posts: 2237
If you trawl back through old posts and find where KenR had some details of standardisation, a point scored in maths was worth more after standardisation than a point scored in the English questions and much more than a point scored in NVR. In other words, NVR is everyone's "best" subject and maths is everyone's "worst" subject.

Mike


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 Post subject: Try
PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 11:17 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 12:07 pm
Posts: 167
You should try simply because you don't want to think in 3 or 4 years time...."If only.....".


And to stress the points made by others......everyone has strong and weak points....the tests are geared to recognise this. You can make up for weak areas by shining in other areas.

Your daughter can certainly do it. Good luck.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 8:18 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:18 pm
Posts: 88
Many thanks for the information! You all know the stresses and strains and perhaps the ones that think that is not worth going through it are just keeping quiet BUT as Za says so rightly in years to come the " what if" will be worse :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 8:54 am 
If you have to have a weakness, it is probably better to be in maths than English. I don't mean for the exam. I mean for later when you attend the school.

I am fairly certain my youngest gained entry due to maths and non-verbal and certainly not her distinctly dodgy English.

As maths only affects maths and science to an extent, I'd sooner her strength had been English which affects a myriad of subjects.

I always say, 'Let the exam sort it out for you' and most often it does.

I have heard all these stories about children not coping but I don't give them much credence; there were about 5 children in my eldest's year (of 150) who clearly were out of their depth but none of them seemed particularly miserable about the fact.

What tends to happen is a mum will make a remark about her son/daughter being snowed under with homework, and the next moment it is all round junior school that X's child is not coping at grammar school.

I, too, worried about my daughter in Year 7 but then realised I was the only one worried. She was just getting on with it--and quietly but steadily raising her game in English because she is surrounded by more able children.


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