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 Post subject: Help!!
PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 10:19 pm 
Hiya all,

Can anyone tell me what reading comprehension in the King Edwards test involves?

Thank you for all your help.

Regards


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:06 am 
Do you mean KE state (Camp Hill etc.) or KE private?

If you mean state, there are two quasi-reading comprehension parts--or there was last year, at least.

1. Proof read a passage (underline spelling and punctuation mistakes as opposed to correct them), then about an hour later answer 4 or 5 questions on this passage without return of the passage. These are more factual (how many, what was the colour) than interpretative questions I believe. So basically the ones with a good memory find it easy and the superficial readers (my daughter) don't. Not worth worrying about at this stage because it is only a few points.

2. Fill in most appropriate word in passage from choice of 4 words. The same word might be used twice in a passage, therefore it must be the word that fits best in both situations. Again targeted at the well-read children with a good 'feel' for English. There were about 7/8 passages with about 6/7 missing words. The missing words weren't represented by blanks but by gobbledygook (say AAASS) so that the same nonsense might appear elsewhere in the same passage requiring the same word (if that makes sense).

If you mean KEHS/KES, then they have traditional comprehensions which require some interpretation of the passage rather than straight factual; most state primary school children will need some coaching in this because they are used to SATS comprehensions which are fairly different. Practice traditional/standard comprehension for this rather than multiple-choice as this quite a different skill. My own daughter can score very highly on a multiple-choice English paper and very indifferently on a traditional comprehension.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 1:55 pm 
Is it possible to DIY for the KE exam, or do you have to go to a tutor?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 2:19 pm 
I don't know anyone who has successfully DIY for the current KE exam apart from the girl who was top of our local primary school and had IQ scores in the 140+ range. I suspect most children do need a professional although I would say that, because that's what I do for a living. Children at one of the independents who specialise in prepping for KE (e.g. BLue Coats, Hallfield etc.) do not need a tutor, in theory, but I believe most of them still go to one even when they are top of their year.
That said, provided you know what's in the exam and prepared to put in the time, it can be done by an educated parent.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 2:54 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11956
I don't see why this 11+ exam should be different to any other - you can DIY


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 3:27 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
mf wrote:
That said, provided you know what's in the exam and prepared to put in the time, it can be done by an educated parent.


That's the key, and basically the aim and purpose of this forum! :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 3:28 pm 
The KE Birmingham exam really is quite different from other entry exams. There is no traditional verbal reasoning, there are no commercial papers available that are in any way similar to the non-verbal component and the maths component requires high-level reading and reasoning skills as well as competency in maths. The vocabulary section (multiple choice, about 75 words in 10 minutes) includes words such as clemency, perplexed, circumnavigate and precarious. When the exam first started, I assumed these words were at the hard end of the spectrum but I now believe they are quite typical.

But, yes, you can do DIY which is what I said in my last post, provided you know exactly what you are targeting and are able to supply a rich vocabulary, punctuation skills for the proofreading and problem solving techniques in the maths.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:47 am 
My son got into Camp Hill this year with just a light bit of DIY tutoring and a few practice papers. I read messages on this forum to get some idea about what he should expect, but other than that, just being well-read and having confidence in his own ability helped him to get in. If you are good enough to get in, I believe you will, without an excess of tutoring.


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 Post subject: ah
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 5:09 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2007 8:55 pm
Posts: 30
Hi all,

I have read and heard that the schools say children should not be tutored and that if their 'clever' enough they'll get in, i find it difficult to believe that children turn up to the test unprepared. I think most parents give their children some tutoring. At the same time it is worrying when you dont know what to expect, it would be nice if the school itself gave out a little more information.

Anymore info on last years test at the KE schools?????

Thanks


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