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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 9:51 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 2:35 pm
Posts: 125
Hi all...

Just wanted to get some views/ideas on how parents are supporting their dcs with homework planning. Our dd is in year 7 and it has been a massive transition for us all; going from zero homework to a steady stream of (doable) homework. At first we just let our dd get on with it, without interference, however, last night dd said that she feels a little overwhelmed at times, not with the actual work itself, but rather the planning and managing of the homework (what to prioritise etc.). She has a planner in which she records the homework that has been set/completed etc. but still seems to get a little lost.

Just wondered if parents could share some strategies and tips on how they have helped dcs with homework planning and management.

Thanks

ps - this conversation may also help to distract me/us from the delay in results. We are expecting results for our ds next week!! :?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 10:04 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
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I think to some extent it depends how they use the planner. Possibly might help to have a bigger one at home - like a wall chart or a wipe clean white board with the next couple of weeks on.

the crucial thing with homework is not the day they receive it but the day it needs to be in - so this is what should get marked and then allocate a time as soon as possible after receiving it to have a go at it...


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 1:04 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 9:10 am
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We have a big whiteboard and write on it, or use post it's.

We are trialling a new approach at the moment - no homework can be outstanding by 2000 on Sunday evening, unless it's a project type homework. This way the boys decide whether to do homework after school or at the weekend, but either way no carry overs to the following week.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 1:45 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:42 pm
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Location: Birmingham
I prefer to go for the day they get the homework approach. This way it requires less planning, is done and out of the way, and they have time to chase up teachers/missed instructions.

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UmSusu


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:01 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 8:59 am
Posts: 431
Location: N London
I agree UmSusu, unless there's a good reason my DC come in (whether straight from school, or later from a club) have a snack and a drink then get on with whatever has been set that day. I try and serve dinner somewhere between 6 and 6.45 depending on what's going on, sometimes that interrupts homework, sometimes they are both done by then. My bugbear at the moment is homework that has gone done or accessed online. If your internet is down or the relevant website is temperamental, it's very frustrating- more so I guess if the work has to be done by tomorrow. Also it's very tempting for DS to switch to a game....


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 2:35 pm
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Some great ideas here! I particularly like the white board idea with post it (color coded for different subjects?!?!?)

Keep them coming....


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
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Location: Reading
I've tried to encourage the 'do it the day you get it' approach, but with an added, 'in the order it needs to be handed in'.

Some doesn't need to be handed in until the following week (or in some cases fortnight) in which case I think it's acceptable to leave until the weekend, if she is snowed under with other stuff. If she has a homework free night with no other activities going on, that I strongly encourage her to start them though so she has more free time at the weekend.

Last year was a bit trickier as she had nearly two hours of dancing on a Friday evening, and definitely didn't want to be doing homework after that, this year she has dropped tap, so only has one hour and it has changed to Monday.


Last edited by Tinkers on Fri Oct 17, 2014 3:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:55 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2013 7:30 am
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2 in different schools in Y7. We have a do it straightaway policy. So one gets in about 4.30 and is very good at getting a snack then going up and getting on with it, but he hasn't had that much it seems, I suspect partly he is very good at focussing at getting on with it, secondly as in a class of 8-10 they get more done in class. However, it will probably get more. Our other DS has far more and it is on a computer based schedule. He comes in at 5.15 or so, looks straight on that and decides, pretty much alone now, but with me to guide if necessary,on what needs to be done that night and what can wait, depending on what clubs etc he has. For info

1. Supper is at 6.45 approx
2. Screen time is after that, 1 hour only, as long as all homework is done, or if not done its a deliberate planning decision. They only need to miss one piece of homework due to favouring the screen and they will lose a day!
3. No homework at the weekend policy. It gets done on Friday night or planned for the following days but as yet none needed to be done at the weekend. We feel strongly about this as they would HATE doing it on a sunday - its hard enough just getting them to polish their shoes!!

All sounds a bit harsh but its working for us, and we seem to have found the right balance, so far, of screen time, gazing at navel time and homework time. I see screen time as something that needs to be earned, and is a just reward for their hard work, but not otherwise. Clubs and activities have been discussed and left up to them, and I'm pleased to say both have chosen to do a bit but not too much, so they can rest up at home.
Also, I have done a list at top of stairs with a checklist on it for each evening (letters to me, phone on charge, bag packed for the morning, that sort of thing) so I don't have to nag them, and another on the front door reminding them what they need to take to school! That way its not mum's fault if they forget (at least thats the idea, LOL!)


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:38 pm 
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In Year 7 my two DC wrote their homework subject and when it had to be in, on a piece of paper that was blue tacked to the fridge door. Not very attractive but it worked very well. They would strike through when done (seemed to get alot of pleasure when striking through each subject) and tackle the homework that was either easiest to do or had to be in the earliest. Having come from a middle school where they had been set quite a lot of homework from Year 5, they knew it was a tried and tested system. That's how I know that one of them always has more homework than the other.

In Year 8 we had a family iPad so the same info was stored on there and deleted when done.

They have always been fairly independent about doing their homework and now they are in Year 10 there are no more lists. Both use their planners provided by the school. One writes down their homework in the diary on the day it is due in whilst the other writes it in his diary the day it is given with a due date next to it.

In terms of them managing their homework, they take part in quite a lot of sporting activities in the evening and weekends so they have lots of strategies for ensuring they meet all their homework deadlines. These activities are on regular evenings so their only free night is Friday. They keep training diaries so they fit their homework around their training/matches/races.

Their strategies include:

-do it as soon as they get it,
-when they come in and before a snack because they have a very early dinner as training later that night
-start it one night and finish it another night if a larger piece
-work at the weekend as they have more time
-set themselves a time limit (say 30 mins to finish one piece) for each piece of homework as they have a lot and they want to remain focused (one of them is easily distracted so this works for him when he is overwhelmed by the amount of homework or how little time he has to complete it before being handed in).
-get at least one piece done during their one free period during the week.

They chose which subject to do and when based on their activities. Ocassionally they miss training if they have too much homework, or one misses it and the other manages to fit it in. Sometimes I do make suggestions as to which homework they should tackle based on how long they predict it will take. As they are so busy, I like to encourage them to get shorter pieces completed when there is the opportunity.

It works well for us and they understand how to prioritise and to meet deadlines whilst taking part in activities they really enjoy and don't want to miss. They understand they have to allow time to get kit, drinks etc ready as well so in many ways their activities have been used as an incentive to complete homework over the years and has proved quite useful.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 5:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 12:06 pm
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Location: Birmingham
Your organisation puts me to shame :oops:


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