Go to navigation
It is currently Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:07 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Passing on either paper
PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2010 7:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2010 6:55 pm
Posts: 247
Hello I am newly registered on this forum and have noticed that lots of useful advice is given!
I am wondering how passes are allocated between the 2 papers. I understand a child can pass on either paper but as there are a fixed number of passes for grammar school places, how are the number of passes allocated between the 2 papers? Thanks for any clarification of my confusion!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2010 7:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8203
Location: Buckinghamshire
Crumbs - there's quite a lot of confusion going on here, Jules7! :lol:

Anyway, welcome, and I am glad you are finding the Forum helpful.

Quote:
I am wondering how passes are allocated between the 2 papers.

The passes aren't allocated according to the two papers. All your child has to do is achieve the magic number of 121 on one paper, and it doesn't matter which one. All the children who achieve 121 could fail the same paper but all qualify on the other.

Quote:
as there are a fixed number of passes for grammar school places, how are the number of passes allocated between the 2 papers?

I'm not sure where you got that bit from, but let's start from the top instead. Although the pass rate remains pretty stable every year at around 30%, it can vary by around +/- 2% depending on how bright the cohort is that are taking the test. There is no "fixed number of passes".

So, if your child achieves 121 on either paper (or you have to appeal and are successful), he or she will be allocated a grammar school place somewhere provided you live in Bucks or out of county but near enough to a Bucks grammar. It is that sweet and simple.

My advice: Avoid any thread on Bucks that has "standardisation" in the title. It will addle your brain as sure as bad eggs is bad eggs!

Please do post any more questions, and we will be happy to help.

Sally-Anne


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2010 8:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2010 6:55 pm
Posts: 247
Thanks so much - I wasn't joking when I said I was confused! A couple more follow-up Qs to demonstrate my ignorance further:
So what happens if more children score 121 than there are grammar school places available?
Does a child who scores say 70/80 on both papers (for example) have more chance of achieving >121 on a paper where other children have done less well on ? i.e. so it's more about how many marks you get relative to everyone else?
Many thanks for clarifying things!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:05 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8203
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi Jules

Jules7 wrote:
So what happens if more children score 121 than there are grammar school places available?

Essentially this doesn't arise, because there are ample GS places for qualified children in general terms. However, when there are more qualified children than places for a particular school, the over-subscription criteria are used to determine who has priority for places. Those criteria are (very roughly):

1. Children in care and those with statements naming the school.
2. Siblings (rules vary a little on the definition of that)
3. Children living within catchment for the school.
4. Distance from school gates.

The criteria are applied in descending order. There are very few schools that are oversubscribed for children living within Bucks - Challoners Boys, John Hampden and Royal Grammar are the pressure points, i.e. boys in South Bucks. Most other grammars are usually able to accommodate virtually all of their first preferences from in-county.

Quote:
Does a child who scores say 70/80 on both papers (for example) have more chance of achieving >121 on a paper where other children have done less well on ? i.e. so it's more about how many marks you get relative to everyone else?

Each of the two papers is marked and standardised completely separately, so if a child has completely flunked one paper, but had a score of 70/80 on the other, that paper should hopefully deliver the magic number of 121. Both papers are supposed to be of equal difficulty, so the situation you describe probably doesn't arise across the whole cohort - I suspect, although I don't know, that the number qualifying on each paper is pretty well the same.

Am I right that your DC had a bit of a drama with one of the tests, but not the other?

Sally-Anne


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 11:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2010 6:55 pm
Posts: 247
Thanks again for the info.
My DD reckons she did OK on both papers but thought the second one easier. People in her year generally thought the second easier and quite a few didn't finish the first one (according to her). Her opinion was that they were similar in difficulty to the practice papers 1 and 2 which she did at school where she scored 74 and 78 so fingers crossed it is a good indication (but who knows really until the scores are on the doors so to speak!). Unfortunately she is an October birthday so she has to rely on getting >70? The main thing is she really made an effort in practising beforehand and tried her best so I hope her good work is rewarded.
I think my previous query with the 2 papers is that if most people did better on the second paper you would have to have a higher raw score to acheive 121 on that paper, if they are standardised separately (and vice-versa with the first paper) ?
This is the first time round for us with the 11+ hence my lack of understanding on how some parts work! This is an excellent site and has helped a great deal !


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016