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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:49 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:25 am
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Hello, thank you all for the great forum!!

Our daughter passed 11+ & will most likely get a place at DCHS. However we are just about making a decision to choose (quite expensive) independent school instead.

Hopefully nothing goes wrong, then she will be staying there until the end BUT if either of us fallen ill, lose job, house flooded etc etc - we may greatly regret in future...

I just would like to know how slim would be the chance to have any grammar place once we let this opportunity go - could somebody give us some indications?

1. Very very unlikely but say, IF any circumstance changed (out of our control) by Dec 08, will she be allowed to sit for 12+ (or 13+) after turning down the 11+ place?

2. I read somewhere that after Year9/10 each school will have waiting list - does anybody have any idea about the real chances on these (assuming our daughter passes exam with good marks).

3. Immediately after she gets (assuming) good marks on GCSE - will IGCSE count for Grammar place? More chances in Year11?

4. At 6th Form entry will it be relatively easy? - but again, IGCSE will be counted?

Many thanks for your help
BUCKSH


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 12:14 pm 
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IMO if a grammar school doesn't recognize IGCSEs for 6th form entry purposes, you wouldn't want to be applying there anyway! The issue with IGCSEs is that they are not counted for league table purposes but I would have thought that any 6th form would be happy to have a student who has done an exam that is recognized to be more stretching than the ordinary GCSE. You could always phone the school and ask what their policy is for 6th form entry - they would probably recognize "equivalent" qualifications as there might be applicants moving to the area from another country, for example.

Can't help with waiting lists, I'm afraid, though I am also interested in any replies to this question. BTW, do you have concerns about the school at which you will be offered a place? Not being nosy - just interested to know why you are giving it up...PM me if you prefer.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 12:32 pm 
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Hi Marylou

Thank you for the input re. 6th Form. So at least there will be some window open at that point then. Still interested to hear the opinion of 12+/13+ and waiting list realities - anybody??

For your question, No we are not concerned over the grammar/ independent school themselves at all - independent has more opportunity, facility and will be her asset in her life we think. I just wanted to know the realistic chances of coming back to Grammar school option in the future, still living in Bucks & paying council tax!

BUCKSH


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
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Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi BucksH

There is nothing to stop your daughter taking the 12+/13+ after passing the 11+ and turning a place down, but do read my Sticky on the subject for full details.

Places are likely to be very hard to come by at every stage from 13+ through to 6th form, as any vacancies will have been filled by successful 12+ candidates.

Sally-Anne


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:40 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:25 am
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Hello Sally-Anne - thank you for your reply.

Yes I have read your Sticky & understand there will be no guarantee of Grammar place after 11+.

So in reality, if she should come out of independent sector, she will have 'a place' in Bucks comprehensive (hopefully this is definete, at least?), put the name on waiting lists on GS, but real hope will be 6th form when quite a lot of students moving around and good GCSE/IGCSE grade should help her to gain place then.

Fair enough!
BucksH


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:49 pm 
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No such thing as a comprehensive in Bucks! If it's not a grammar school, it's an upper school. Comprehensive schools cater for all ability ranges (or are supposed to :roll: ), whilst upper schools by definition can't do this as the higher-ability kids have been "creamed off" by the 11+. That's not to say that there are not some very bright children in upper schools, and indeed some such schools are better than others at looking after their more able pupils, it's just that the "top set" won't be the same as a top set in a comprehensive. I personally think that a move from a high-achieving independent school to a state upper would be quite difficult.

Are you near a county boundary with a good comp just the other side of it? That is worth investigating as an option.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:25 am
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Sorry, 'Upper school' then --- we are not so near the boundary but yes I will keep that option in mind. I know at least what I should do & what I can expect, thanks to this forum. I wonder any other parents choosing Independent ever worry about this... am I too neurotic?

Hopefully nothing drastic will happen - but who knows!

BucksH


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 2:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 8:17 am
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I recently did an oversubscription appeal with a friend for a child moving out of the independent sector to an oversubscribed oxfordshire school. The reasons for the move included financial ones.

A special hearing was convened just for the one child almost immediately.

I would presume that a child who NEEDS to come out of the independent sector for any reason would then be treated according to the "late transfer" procedures set out in the admissions booklet - which presumably you have. In fact you might stand a better chance of getting a place if you moved your child mid year rather than at the end of a school year.

I wonder if your question comes from niggling doubts about your decision to go the independent route. You have chosen the school you really want, and I am sure your child will be really successful there. Try not to dwell too much on the "What if?" scenario.

Hilda


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 3:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:25 am
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Dear Hilda

Thank you for your input - you are right, we should stand what we have decided. Once 'the accpetance deadline' is passed I shall feel settled I guess.

I have read somewhere 80% of parents paying for independent schools are paying from monthly income; ie. not from 'Trust' set aside or comfortable savings or just being millionaire, so we are not alone!

Kind Regards
BucksH


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 3:24 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2006 1:21 am
Posts: 2125
It might be worth investigating burseries and scholarships at your chosen school. If the worst were to happen and you did lose your income, then the school might be persuaded to view your case sympathetically rather than lose a good pupil. Otherwise there might be some kind of insurance policy against loss of income - the type you get to pay your bills if you are made redundant. I'm no expert on these and don't know if they would cover school fees, but it's just an idea.


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