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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 2:07 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:52 pm
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Location: Bucks
Hi everyone,

Am thinking about the 12+ next year for my child and am hoping to get some feedback on whether the children themselves want to move after having being in a new school for Year 7 (assuming they pass!) I have heard that some parents say that in the summer hols their kids have changed their minds ! Also any fedback on how the children have settled (good or bad!) in the grammars in Y8 would be very much appreciated too so that I can keep an open mind ! Thanks all.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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I have seen it from both sides - both as a parent of 12+ entrant and as a GS teacher.

Children quickly settle and my child wanted and needed the challenge of a GS - has never been happier.

As a teacher I felt the new entrants usually caught up quickly and I can't think of one that didn't thrive -


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 8:59 am 
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Thank you so much guest for your reply - glad your child settled well; must be a real comfort to you both. Out of interest, how confident were you that he/she would pass - any advice/comments on that would also be appreciated as I don't think we could bear another near miss !


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:31 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
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Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi traccb

My son has settled in extremely well after his first term-and-a-half at a GS via the 12+. He is in a great class, who have all befriended him and he has the rituals of school life sorted.

He hasn't struggled with the standard of work at all. He did take time to find his level on the amount of effort required (i.e. somewhat more than none at all!), but he is cruising happily along now.

We had some blips in the first few weeks, with teachers not realising that he didn't know the routine, so I would have liked to see the school extend the very impressive induction they provided for the Year 7s to the 12+ children in Year 8 as well. They did rather get thrown in and left to sink or swim!

As to knowing if he would pass? Well, he was a very near miss first time round and his academic performance in Year 7 went from strength to strength, so that left us feeling optimistic.

The few practice sessions we did were initially a little worrying - still a few too many marks away from a comfortable pass, but in the 2-3 days before the test he suddenly began to storm into the high 90% range, so I think that was the moment at which I felt much more confident. (Typical boy - left it to the last moment! :roll: )

Good luck - I do hope it works out for you this time. If you haven't read my Sticky, you will find that it contains good news for the most part!

Sally-Anne


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:28 am
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Location: Bexley
Hi,

I know of a child who moved to grammar in year 8.

This case is slightly different as she did in fact pass her 11+ but her parents felt that if she passed, it would be only just, and then she might struggle. We have to name the schools before we know the result! So, a comp was listed as her 1st choice and she settled well into this school. However, the work did not stretch her enough and her parents applied to the grammar schools in the area. At that point they were all full and it wasn't until year 8 that a place became available. The child settled well and coped with the work well and still does. She has two groups of friends now, one from the comp and one at the new grammar.

Best of both worlds!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 12:10 pm 
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A message to Sally Anne and Tracey - thank you for spending the time to reply and am very pleased about your son Sally Anne and also the child you mentioned Tracey; heart warming to hear these stories as a number of people are advising me to think very carefully about moving my daughter in Y8 and also advise not to. My daughter was a near miss (120/120!!) but I want to be sure that she doesn't experience another failure hence the questions about how confident parents are over the 12+ exam. I have to say Sally Anne that in my dark days after a failed appeal I found this website ( all too late!) and your sticky on the 12+ really gave me hope. You've answered nearly all the questions - great sticky. One question for you both - did the children in question ask to sit the 12+ or did you ( other parents in Tracey's case) make the decision that it would be for the best ?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 12:56 pm 
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Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi traccb

It was a joint decision really. There was never any doubt in my mind that he should attempt it, and he decided to go for it after discussing the pros and cons, including the possibility that he might not pass.

All the way through it we reassured him that there was a good alternative if the 12+ didn't work out, and made it clear to him that the Bucks VR test is not infallible as a test of ability. He knew that even if he didn't achieve 121 he would not be a "failure".

As for the warnings about moving your child in Year 8, the cynic in me wonders if they are parents whose child didn't get anywhere near the pass mark and they are motivated by jealousy? Or parents of your child's friends who don't want their own child's orderly life disrupted by your daughter moving out of the same orbit?

Children move schools all the time, even in their GCSE year - it is quite ridiculous to say that "you should not move your child in Year 8". What dire consequences are they predicting? My son is far happier socially at his GS than he ever was at his previous school, and every 12+ child I know is perfectly happy and settled at their new school.

I think you need to question their motives and what real experience they have of the situation before giving credence to their opinions.

With a first time score of 120/120 she is GS material without any doubt.

Best wishes
Sally-Anne


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 2:49 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:28 am
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Location: Bexley
I would take advice from people who have been in the same situation as you. There is a lot of jeasously out there and any advice from these 'friends' is somewhat biased.

Only you truly know your daughter and her capabilities. Not only do you have to look at the academic side but her committment to studying, workload and the eagerness to learn. Only you know the answer.

If my daughter had not made it in grammar this year we had already decided that it would have been a 'bad day' and that she would be taking the 12+.

Someone else on this forum has posted figures saying that 70% of 12+children pass. If this is correct then your daughter stands a very good chance. If she does not then it will confirm that she isn't meant to be at grammar. Surely either way it goes it will give you peace of mind.

That aside, it's your daughter who has to go through it again. I believe that if a child really wants that grammar place then they should go for it. If she doesn't seem keen to want to undertake the work then you already have your answer.

You might get a 2nd unfavourable result but if you explain all the reasons for wanting to try again, and the negative side too, then it won't be as much of a disappointment as the 11+ results, just confirmation.

If she passes and gets offered a grammar place then let it be her choice to move. She will know that she can do it and she has every right to be there. Go through all the positive aspects of changing schools. If she really wants to maintain friendships from her current school she will no matter what.

As Sally- Anne has said, children move school all the time. If you were moving house to another area, then she would have no option. Please don't worry about her not settling. All year 6 kids worry about about their new schools and after a couple of weeks in year 7 most are settled. She can do it again if she really wants to. x


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 6:40 pm 
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We were not sure child would qualify at 12+ even with 3 level 5s (and high marks) at KS2 as VR is a stumbling block to some children (like ours) with special needs.

However they are a year older and, perhaps, not quite as anxious?

As I said I have seen many 12+ entrants over the years and every single one thrived.

Aim for the KS2 tests now as two level 5s (or better!) are encouraged for 12+ entry.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:57 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:52 pm
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Location: Bucks
Thank you everyone for your words of support. In my heart I have no doubt that she is right for the environment and am pleased that you've all had such positive experiences - just hope we can join you all next year! At least there is still a chance to put "a wrong right" as one member of the forum stated. Hope your kids are still doing well. :D


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