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PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2009 10:07 am 
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Strictly limited time offer as I'll probably forget about this site. I saw it mentioned on another website and as I don't want to reveal where I live there thought I'd offer to answer questions here.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:52 pm 
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Location: CORNWALL
yes please


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2009 11:06 pm 
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much of what you hear is rubbish. The students do not all work very hard - mine didn't and has all A*/A grades at GSCE. They get less homework than the top stream in nearby Axe Valley. It starts off on a high but gradually diminishes. They are tested so often the actual GSCEs do not cause much stress, especially as they know their A level results matter more. Apparently they are more stressed at A level, although I've yet to see that.

Students are not all from private schools, although some are. Wouldn't listen to the "familiarisation is enough" line but extensive tutoring isn't needed either. Buy practise papers so your child learns test technique.

The school is very traditional in what it teaches. There is a limited choice of subjects for GSCE and A level. Music is almost entirely classical music. It is elitist, arrogant and amoral.

The physically advanced find it easiest to settle in. There are lots of sports clubs and the standard is high. Many students learn some sort of musical instrument and/or sing in choir. The choir does trips abroad. There is a Carnegie book club where students can read the Carnegie short list and vote on their choice.

Bullying isn't a major problem but it does happen, more often in the earlier years.

One or two children leave in the first term as they miss their friends or can't face the travelling. Therefore one or two do join from the waiting list. After that departures are rare until the 6th form when some leave to do subjects not available at the school.

Taking GSCE a year means your child is less mature and less inclined to work hard before the exams. It also forces your child to make A level choices early.

The school does not have a good relationship with the local community and shows no desire to improve it.

If you have a son at Colyton expect (non-serious) injuries. The school still does science experiments other schools have abandoned on h&s grounds. There are quite a few sports injuries.

There is always a massive amount of lost property - label everything. There are sometimes thefts, although probably fewer than most schools.

Anything specific and I'll try to answer.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 7:43 pm 
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After reading the last post I think that another viewpoint may be beneficial.
I have two children at Colyton, usually they are quite anti me commenting on this site but this time they have told me to 'go for it'!

True, the workload is not too heavy. As I write this I have four Colyton pupils shooting things on the Playstation in the next room and not one has any homework left to do!
GCSE's come and go without much stress and my child's grades were good. Choices for A level are reasonable, they offer everything a decent university course will require and a selection of other, less academic options like DT and Sports studies too.
I think the potential benefits of the three year sixth form will outweigh any problems from starting them younger. The school takes it's responsibilities very seriously and everyone gets support and advice on subject choices.

I must disagree with the comment on physically advanced children fitting in easier. Both of my children have fitted in extremely well and very easily. One is small and young in the year, the other tall. One is outgoing and confident the other shy and quiet.

There are lots of clubs for the children to get involved with. Sports Clubs are popular but they are not elitist. One of the strengths of the sports is that the teachers make the school teams up from those children who bother to attend the clubs regularly. Effort is rewarded much more than talent! As for as injuries, I'm not aware of anything much on this front and I know a lot of sporty boys at the school (they all do science too!)

No mention has been made of the excellent Duke of Edinburgh award scheme which is extremely popular and very well run. Community involvement is a must for every child participating in it!

I live in the local area and am not aware of a big negative opinion of the school. There will always be people who put it down but usually this is because their children didn't get in! The school does get involved in local things. They attend the local goose fayre and the school runs lots of days for local primary school children to use the sports and science facilities.

Art and drama are also very strong at the school and the quality of provision is high.

Lost property is down to the individuals. My children manage to find everything they mislay. The school has a very good system to help them!

Hope this of use to potential parents. We moved across the country so our children could go to this school and we have never regretted a moment!


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:29 pm 
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For A level choices you can look at the school's own guide - but be aware that subjects that are mentioned (like sports studies) are only offered if there are enough people wanting to do it. So a subject that is mentioned may only be available to AS level or not at all. General Studies is a compulsory subject at A level but is poorly regarded by the better universities. Critical Thinking is also a compulsory choice but is held in only slightly better regard.

Perhaps creamtea having moved to the area is unaware of the local feeling. I'm afraid a few people helping at a goose fair held once a year (most years, they skipped one recently) is not much community involvement. Although pupils do play a fanfare for the goose fair the music has usually been provided mainly by pupils from the Woodruffe school in Lyme Regis. It does not outweigh problems over e.g the location of the sports hall and the lighting at the hall.

DofE requires community involvement but "community" is defined to include helping with activities at school. Large numbers do the bronze award, very few get to gold. The children come from far and wide, hence activity is spread over a large area and not much of it takes place in the local community.

Obviously creamtea's children have been lucky with injuries. So have mine - but I know that there are burns in science lessons and minor sporting injuries are common. The air ambulance can land on the sports field and has done so, although it is very rare for injuries to be that severe. Sick children can be a problem for parents as for some it is a long journey to pick them up. It is one disadvantage of the long bus journeys.

Art and drama are popular, although with a heavy emphasis on academic studies few students choose to go to art college.

The school does offer help with career choices, although " take subjects you enjoy doing" forms a large part of the advice. They do continue to offer advice for those who regret their choice of university course.

I feel very strongly that the early choice of subject is harmful. There is academic research showing that the age at which children sit exams has a strong influence on their grades and that this persists until A level. Other schools with high achieving pupils are not taking the same approach.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 10:15 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:51 pm
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Location: CORNWALL
Thank you to buzzard and creamtea for both points of view.
One of my questions was going to be about sports teams but creamtea has answered that.
We are applying from out of area but I did spend some time talking individually to local residents to hear their opinion. Comments were very favourable apart from some lingering dissatisfaction over the way the school handled recent building work.
It is very helpful to hear how current parents feel about their experience of the school and not information people like myself (from out of area) would normally be privy to, so thanks again.


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 Post subject: Colyton
PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 10:40 am 
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Location: English Channel
Thanks for all the info on the recent posts. It's great to hear something about Colyton. We were over to take the practice test recently and were very impressed with the way everything was organised and how they made sure that no-one was overwhelmed. I should think that the traffic jam was annoying for the people that live in the immediate area, but hopefully that doesn't happen too often. I have relatives in the village and they seem to be quite happy to have the school there. I think more people are up in arms about Tesco in Seaton!
I don't know if my DS will get in but we'll continue to visit and certainly from an outsider's perspective, it looks like a great school with equally great facilities. That's why it's so interesting to find out what it's really like from different perspectives. Thanks!
JJ

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 1:46 pm 
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Last edited by Loopyloulou on Tue Aug 09, 2011 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 2:42 pm 
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I'm absolutely staggered at the allegations of Colyton being 'amoral' - unless empowering pupils with a wide appreciation of various religious beliefs is indeed the definition of 'amoral' - which isn't my understanding.

Good luck, Jolly Jersey!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 3:05 pm 
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Last edited by Loopyloulou on Tue Aug 09, 2011 2:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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