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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2009 8:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:56 pm
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I was quite disturbed (more than usual) to hear at the 'transfer meeting' for parents at our primary school that the head, nor the school would support parents in the event of an appeal.

We were told that it would hold no weight anyway and that supporting pupils was paramount to encouraging corruption within the system.

Not wishing to be negative, in the run up to the big day, but do all primary schools have this policy? If not surely children from those non-supportive primaries may lose out as a result.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2009 9:02 pm 
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No they don't.

I believe that county policy means that heads can't actively encourage parents to opt for selective schools but they are certainly allowed to give support should an appeal be necessary.

We don't have a transfer meeting but I know our head has at least two successful appeals to his credit since being at our school, basically 100% success rate. In fact I had serious concerns about whether DS1 would pass last year and made a point of asking our head whether he would be prepared to support DS should we have needed to take that route.

That said he would not support an appeal for a Grammar school place unless it was right for the child.

So yes that does unfairly put some children at a disadvantage should they fail to perform on the day for some reason.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:41 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2008 1:25 pm
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yes, EE, that sounds bad. Our head has said (to another parent who went in for a chat) that he would support any of the children in the event of an appeal. I assume he would have decided that he thinks they're all up to it (hear the noise of straws being clutched at and read the dreary continuation of nervous self-boosting)


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 8:09 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 4:32 pm
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Location: Gloucestershire
After going through an appeal this year, we were lucky enough to have support from our headteacher, albeit in a very non-committal/ unbiased way. Our headteacher explained to ALL parents that they couldn't be seen to be favouring any particular child in the event of an appeal as there may well be the odd occasion where they didn't feel that support was duly warranted, and may then come under criticism if they did in fact give full support to all children in the event of an appeal. Our support took the form of a two sentence letter confirming that our child was dilligent, hardworking and would suit a grammar school environment. There was no mention of academic ability, as this was evidenced by our child's predicted SATs scores which all appeal panels have access to, prior to an actual appeal. At the appeal, we felt the fact that the headteacher had given this minimal support did help, although other factors were more persuasive in our case and fortunately we were successful.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 11:08 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 8:03 pm
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Location: Gloucestershire
hetty wainthrop wrote:
There was no mention of academic ability, as this was evidenced by our child's predicted SATs scores which all appeal panels have access to, prior to an actual appeal. At the appeal, we felt the fact that the headteacher had given this minimal support did help, although other factors were more persuasive in our case and fortunately we were successful.


WRONG!

We only have access to the predicted SATS scores if the school fill in the questionnaire that the clrk / county send out. If the head or person filling it in doesn't agree with 11+, either it doesn't come back or bits are not filled in. One question is only completed in 50% of returns: "Would a grammar education suit this child? with a Y or N box.

Some schools (private), don't sit SATS, so there are no predicted SAT scores, though they often submit other scores. Trying to compare them is a nightmare (to put it mildly), especially when they are teacher marked, rather than standardised. Some teachers want their pupils to go to grammars, others not. We have to try & see through staff prejudice, parental ability to write appeals, presentation skills and the like and judge if the child really should have a place vs. affecting the children who already have a place.

Argh!

I really hope that all of your children pass. The less appeals, the better :D

_________________
Capers


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:15 am 
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I hope so too.

Even with head support it is not a route I want to be taking I want the stress over pronto.


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