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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2007 8:57 am
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Location: Gloucestershire
How does your child's primary feel about the 11+? I have been told that the school discourages a child being told their results until after school on the 4th March in case other children have not got a place, even though other parents may have had their post/an email before they set off for school. While I appreciate that the feelings of all children should be taken into account I think it is really sad that if my child is successful then this is not something the school apparently wants to be celebrated. My child has had several comments made by the class teacher re the merits of a comprehensive over a grammar school education. Fine though for school to spend hours practising for the SATs to then say how well they have done in the league tables!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 6:35 pm 
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Know exactly what you mean Stroud Mum. My sons school are exactly the same. At the very mention of Grammar School they shut off completely. I asked my sons teacher at parents evening in year 5 if she thought he would be suitable for Grammar and she said she was unable to comment. This reaction was the same for all other parents who asked the same question. At the end of the day they teach your child so it would be nice for some indication. As it happens his tutor gave him a test on his first visit to see if he was Grammar school material which she felt he definately was.

As for celebrating on results day I don't think the school will even mention it. There was no 'good luck' said to anyone the day before even though a fair few sat the test.

In all other ways it is a good school just a shame they don't support the 11+.

Good luck for March 4th.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 7:14 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2007 4:14 pm
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Location: Gloucester
i would say their attitude is mixed.Whilst teachers would not comment on my sons ability to pass the 11+ and cope with grammar school,they were all given the weekend off from homework the weekend of the test( a small gesture I know!).
The Monday after the test he was asked how it had gone,and when we received the results all the children were asked how they had got on.
Pity the SATS boostering wasn't done for the 11+-my nephew has just started school in Essex and the school run an after school club for the 11+ test!!! They certainly seem to value the high number of children going to grammar school there.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 7:24 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 5:20 pm
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Location: On another planet called Gloucester!
I too find the attitude of primary schools in Gloucestershire poor when it comes to the 11+ even though we are fortunate enough to have quite a few in this County!

My DS's year 5 teacher at our parent/teacher meeting was very keen for him to pursue a place at a grammar school saying she believed he would be well suited to it (as she had personal experience through family members attending the school and compared his ability). However his year 6 teacher in September 2007 did nothing but champion the local comprehensive and warned us that we may not even get into this comprehensive unless we put it down as a first preference. This was shocking especially since I already knew the first preference system had been abolished! The school offered no advice or help whatsoever in preparing for the 11+ exam nor made any enquiry as how anybody got on!

It seems to me all they care about is ensuring the children are prepared and ready for the SATS - which is really only for their own benefit in the league tables!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 7:26 pm 
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Location: Gloucestershire
Back in November the whole class was asked to put their hands up if they had passed and then the names noted down! It seemed to be assumed that those who had passed would be boasting; the reality is that all my child's friends were keen to support each other. At my son's state school they were upfront about the chances of a child passing, and guess what, each year a really high proportion made it to a grammar.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 10:22 pm 
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Hi, my experience of primary school's supporting GS is similar to gloucestermum's, ie.none. If you want your child to try for a place you have to DIY it. I was happy to do this as school only seems to be run for the benefit of school. I have become completely disinterested in the whole system of primary education, my daughter is bored, unchallenged, and cannot wait to leave.

I feel disappointed that her primary school years have ended in this way, as I have always been a parent who supports school ethos etc. but the system has beaten us.... we give up.... and await secondary school with hopeful anticipation


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:55 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 5:45 pm
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Location: Medway & Kent
I feel quite torn actually.
On one hand I have been where you all describe, frustrated that there is no support from the school at all for the 11+. Grammar schools in Kent make up part of the state system so I could not understand the lack of support.
Then in November we received our results from our first 11+ which my daughter was fortunately successful. However several of her friends wasn't successful and it really did cast a dampner on the occasion. My daughters friends desperated wanted to pass as they loved the school they could get into. The school were supportive of the review process and when it was not successful again the parents and children had to be dealt another blow. We are talking about bright kids. level 5's etc. Such a shame. It did make me think that the teachers and head see this, year in and year out, childrens hopes dashed and i wonder if this contributes to the lack of enthusiasm for the system.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 7:23 pm 
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Location: On another planet called Gloucester!
It breaks my heart when I read on this forum about really bright children failing appeals - the system is wrong. Should we really be putting this sort of pressure on 10 year olds? Yet it is virtually the only way of ensuring a decent education. When I was at School, I wasn't even aware of undertaking any sort of examinations in primary school but obviously did and I achieved a place at a grammar school and loved every minute. Why and when did this change? It's such a shame that our children cannot be assessed on their genuine ability in a familiar school environment and not as the result of a test - tutored or not!

Rant over!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:39 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 8:03 pm
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Location: Gloucestershire
Burneth wrote:
It breaks my heart when I read on this forum about really bright children failing appeals - the system is wrong. Should we really be putting this sort of pressure on 10 year olds? Yet it is virtually the only way of ensuring a decent education. When I was at School, I wasn't even aware of undertaking any sort of examinations in primary school but obviously did and I achieved a place at a grammar school and loved every minute. Why and when did this change? It's such a shame that our children cannot be assessed on their genuine ability in a familiar school environment and not as the result of a test - tutored or not!


What breaks mine is that I know sometimes that the reason the appeal has failed is that there are only so many seats that can be squeezed into a classroom. The genuinely bright child who has come to appeal, has lost their place to a less-abled child who was tutored hard for 18 months just to get them through the exam, and hence passed. But they are not as bright. And we have to turn down the appeal. Really isn't fair. But has anyone got any suggestions (other than allowing all the appeals and having 40 children per class, with some sitting on others laps)?

We knew we were taking the 11+ back in 1971 in Surrey. But it was more of a sorting hat - it was deciding which school would give us the best chances. I still feel like that - if my child doesn't pass next year, then the local comp is fine, and will suit as well as the local grammar if childs ability is in that range.

I agree that it should be sat in school as part of a normal SATS time, with a little prep first (the sample papers).

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