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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2011 11:49 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 11:33 am
Posts: 137
Hi Everyone - I am new to the forum. Please can someone recommend an English tutor for my DS. I am getting him ready for 11+. He's doing ok in all subjects except English - comp. and written. Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2011 9:38 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 11:11 am
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I am also interested in an English teacher around Borehamwood and its environs.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 6:06 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 10:23 pm
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I've said it before and I'll say it again. Don't tutor them in English - make them read. Buy them books/get them out of the library. Lots and lots and lots of classics (and some modern stuff too if they like it). Far and way the best way to improve comprehension, vocab, get a feel for style, etc etc is just to read loads. And get them inspired by what they read to write creatively. For fun.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2011 7:39 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 11:33 am
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herty wrote:
I've said it before and I'll say it again. Don't tutor them in English - make them read. Buy them books/get them out of the library. Lots and lots and lots of classics (and some modern stuff too if they like it). Far and way the best way to improve comprehension, vocab, get a feel for style, etc etc is just to read loads. And get them inspired by what they read to write creatively. For fun.

Thanks - I know this is very important - he's just been given a few classics - but I need to have the energy to sit with him to check his understanding - this is tough as I have no energy in evenings and wanted to delegate this to someone better educated than me! Was looking for someone with some magic dust that could scatter some over the boy! Looks like I will have to find the energy somehow :!:

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2011 8:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 10:23 pm
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If he is going to be able to cope by himself in a grammar school, he should be able to cope with reading a book without you being there to help... Give him a dictionary and encourage him to ask you questions if he'd rather, but otherwise save the comprehension questions for a more relaxed chat over dinner/on the way somewhere - are you enjoying the book? why/why not? what are the best bits? do you think your brother/friend etc should read it? why/why not? Easier if you pick books that were your favourites as a kid, so you can ask more specific questions and also show your affection/passion for the book, which is catching! I was so pleased when my dd loved Ballet Shoes as I had done, and enjoyed Little Women despite the huge gulf in cultural understanding (both geographical and historical). Don't underestimate your ds - he can read great works of children's literature (and so many of the best books written have been for kids) and enjoy them, as generations of others have done. Yes, he will be expanding his vocab/comprehension etc while he does that - but ideally that should be seamless. Literature isn't and shouldn't be viewed as a chore - either for you or him. It's a joy and a window into other mysterious, magical and wonderful worlds.

Sorry - got a tad evangelical again. :oops:


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