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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 12:29 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2011 9:34 pm
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http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/201 ... oring-boom

I have to agree most parts in the article..expecially "parents on low incomes and ethnic minority families who are making substantial sacrifices to give their children extra academic help. "
I am one of the parent who did take my ds to 3 teachers last year (for eleven plus) and found out that they are more interested in the monetary part of it then to teach ( no teaching was required, only guide) my son. Out of 3 teachers,

Don't get me wrong - I have not problems if the tuition is being taught by a Teacher who has experience teaching childrens, as Tuition is un-regulated most of the time, it will be done by a parent who has got experience tutoring for his/her kid and took up tutoring as another source of income. We should keep in mind that the Tutors could undermine, as well as build, a child's confidence.
It only takes a few classes to know if the teacher is making an impact on the child or not, as my DS made it very clear that the tuition which we are paying is a waste as the tutor is not teaching anything new which he does not know, but making use of bond papers.

For Eleven plus, I can conclude that children need to have lots of practise/encouragement from parents on the subjects which is being tested and dont require Tutors who charge way too much for their services.


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 12:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
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There are many, many threads on tuition vs DIY on here. People have different reasons for choosing one over the other. For example I am temperamentally (sp??) ill suited to coaching my children due to the personalities involved! If the parents can teach the various techniques needed and have the patience to ensure their child will sit down and do the work, that is great. My children did not understand the implications of the 11 plus at the age of just over 9 and responded better to work set by a "teacher" than mum or dad nagging and trying to fit it in between the school/cubs/ballet/football runs.

There are plenty of resources out there for those who want to DIY, so it shouldn't have to be a financial issue, more one of aptitude. I agree that there are tutors who may not deliver the help needed - it is an unregulated industry and there will always be people who want to make money more than they want to help children learn the material or techniques they need to know.


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 2:06 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:21 am
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All DCs need guildance whether it is through school, parents or private tutors. By doing it DIY is much cheaper but you would need to have the time and know-how. Like other menbers have mentioned not all DCs work well with their parents and some children learn better in group teaching rather than one to one. The most important thing is to find the right environment to stimulate the interest of learning.


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 5:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2011 8:29 am
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I also DIYd with my dd who has got into HBS. I didn't want to get her tutored as I knew I could do it myself. I am in education and so am probably at an advantage compared with a lot of other parents, plus my dd reacts favourably to me teaching her which is just luck, basically.

This does not, however , mean that I am against tutoring. On the contrary I make my living providing GCSE, A level and also undergraduate tuition, having taught for many years in the state sector in secondary schools (including one of the super selectives mentioned daily on this board). Tutors are a varied breed and I suppose, as in any other field, you will find fantastic tutors as well as utterly dreadful ones. Generally I would advise people only to go on recommendations, although at 11+ parents do become uber covetous of their dc's tutor(s). This is not an issue for me since that element of competition does not apply to the age group I teach.

It's a bit disingenuous to express surprise that tutors are - by gosh - motivated financially though. Were you expecting them to do it for free? :?


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 5:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
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piggys wrote:
It's a bit disingenuous to express surprise that tutors are - by gosh - motivated financially though. Were you expecting them to do it for free?


You are right, of course, that is why I go to work too, but I think you know what I'm getting at :)


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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 11:38 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2011 3:14 pm
Posts: 625
there are lots of reasons for taking on a tutor - we did for our son for the last 6 months as personalities clashed constantly and tempers were frayed from the beginning of every session. I'm a tutor as well but when it comes to teaching your own children, too much emotion is involved and it is better to take a step back sometimes and involve a third party.


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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 6:13 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2012 5:55 pm
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My DD is at Henrietta Barnett School. Everyone we know there has either been externally tutored, family tutored or been at Prep School. The only successful family tutors I know of there are professional Teachers. There may be the odd exception which proves this rule, but not many.

We had a Tutor - he was amazing, both in supporting us as parents and in coaching our child.


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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 7:21 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 14, 2013 6:30 pm
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it all boils down to what one considers the definition of Tutoring to be?

Even home diy the odd 15-30mins by a parent FOC is tutoring; reading tips and techniques on maths or VR is tutoring. It does not have to so formally organised in a class on a saturday with 20 other kids and at £25 ph; it can be FOC on a relaxed sofa with a large cup of mocha in hand.

There is no right or wrong; each family has to make its own choices based on individual circumstance such as available spare funds, time constraints, etc..

Good luck.


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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 8:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 2:51 pm
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Well said sbarnes. Too many posters come on here to say their child made it without tutoring, when just by the fact that they are giving their children practice papers they are tutoring. Tutoring is tutoring whether it is paid for or not. Some children need it for longer than others, it is up to parents to decide what they believe is best for their children. If your child got into a super selective without it great, if they did it after having several months of tutoring, they did great too.


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PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 8:28 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 14, 2013 6:30 pm
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thanks; I doubt very much that any child gets in a selective school without some form of 'tutoring'. Those that claim their child received no tutoring either do not know the definition of 'tutoring' or are being 'conservative' with the facts.


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