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PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 7:05 pm 
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Location: Cheshire
split from "The WGGS Triple Science Saga"
For what it is worth, heres my opinion, the only advantage of an all girls school is that girls do better at STEM subjects than if at a co-ed(there is good evidence for this).

We need girls to get into STEM subjects for which triple science is an advantage but if DD is adamant in not pursuing a STEM or medical(or allied) career double science would be fine even for the very top flight universities.

In fact, for those who wish to do a humanities or linguistic degrees it would be better to do an extra humanity or language gcse instead of an extra science.

If unsure about future career/degree always choose triple science if capable.

Triple science is no more difficult for girls than boys if nurtured in the right environment be it in single gender schools or mixed schools.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 9:17 pm 
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Catseye - where is the evidence that girls of the same ability at KS2 do better at GCSE in Science in a single gender school?

Please post a link.

Girls only avoid science if they are 'taught' that it's a boys subject ... that influence sometimes comes from their home.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 9:40 pm 
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"Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, said: "All the research shows single-sex schools are good for girls but bad for boys – both in terms of academic performance and socialisation."


"For instance, more girls choose to study maths and science in single-sex schools and more boys pick the arts and humanities than if they were taught in mixed classes.

""A central finding is that single-sex schooling moderates the effect of gender-stereotyping in terms of choice of field of study," says the research.

"This runs counter to earlier assertions that co-education would widen subject choice."



http://www.independent.co.uk/news/educa ... 31636.html


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 10:27 pm 
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“Girls’ schools can’t eradicate this kind of cultural conditioning, but we can take significant steps towards minimising it and the results indicate that this does boost girls’ confidence in their maths and science abilities,” Jones said.

Pupils at all-girls schools are more likely to study subjects such as physics and maths to A-level.

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2 ... ngineering

Do you want me go on?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 7:05 am 
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A coed school local to me has tripled the number of girls taking A level physics.

By teaching boys and girls separately for sciences. It was part of an experiment by the institute of physics I think.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 8:06 am 
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Tinkers wrote:
A coed school local to me has tripled the number of girls taking A level physics.

By teaching boys and girls separately for sciences. It was part of an experiment by the institute of physics I think.


This has been tried elsewhere and didnt work - the boys did worse!


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 8:07 am 
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Catseye wrote:
"Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, said: "All the research shows single-sex schools are good for girls but bad for boys – both in terms of academic performance and socialisation."


"For instance, more girls choose to study maths and science in single-sex schools and more boys pick the arts and humanities than if they were taught in mixed classes.

""A central finding is that single-sex schooling moderates the effect of gender-stereotyping in terms of choice of field of study," says the research.

"This runs counter to earlier assertions that co-education would widen subject choice."



http://www.independent.co.uk/news/educa ... 31636.html



Link me to the research papers please - this is newspaper 'spin'.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 7:29 pm 
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Location: Cheshire
Guest55 wrote:
Catseye wrote:
"Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, said: "All the research shows single-sex schools are good for girls but bad for boys – both in terms of academic performance and socialisation."


"For instance, more girls choose to study maths and science in single-sex schools and more boys pick the arts and humanities than if they were taught in mixed classes.

""A central finding is that single-sex schooling moderates the effect of gender-stereotyping in terms of choice of field of study," says the research.

"This runs counter to earlier assertions that co-education would widen subject choice."



http://www.independent.co.uk/news/educa ... 31636.html



Link me to the research papers please - this is newspaper 'spin'.



Single gender classes
Whilst worldwide research on single gender classes indicates some success in increasing levels of attainment in both boys and girls, there are some wider advantages and disadvantages that should be considered.

Advantages

There is less disruption to the learning of girls and quieter boys.

The content of the curriculum can be adjusted to suit boys and girls interests, for example, in reading materials.

Boys can relax and express themselves more effectively when girls are not present and they take more risks in their learning.

The absence of boys can empower girls and make them more assertive.

Disadvantages

There is a danger of introducing or reinforcing male/female stereotypes.

Male teachers can sometimes reinforce a macho or ‘laddish’ culture and the learning climate can often be characterised by confrontation.

Not all boys or girls behave or think like ‘typical’ boys or ‘typical’ girls.

Same sex classes can result in the relatively higher attainment of girls, thus widening the gap in attainment between girls and boys.


http://www.journeytoexcellence.org.uk/r ... cation.asp

Now I have shown you mine, now show me your evidence-I will accept "newspaper spin"


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 9:21 pm 
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That is a Scottish organisation - where's the original research papers?

None of those observation ring any bells in my career - in fact the complete opposite.

The single gender schools are highly selective most mixed schools aren't. Even in Bucks the intake of the GS is very different in the proportion of [old] level 5s.

I've seen no research that compares children of the same ability at KS2 with GCSE outcomes.


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