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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:24 am 
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Hi, I Home educate my DC, one of whom will be taking the Kent Test next year. Will we be treated like an OOC, does anyone know? I was wondering if we would be required to sit a 'writing' part of the paper, as if we were treated like OOC, presumably it wouldn't be marked. BUT we are in catchment for a couple of grammars! Am a bit confused :? Does anyone have any experience of this?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:01 am 
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You could sign up your child to sit the Kent test online, Regardless of whether they've been taught at home. OOC would refer to if you are inside the catchment of your chosen school or not. Which school are you looking at?

Some schools have no catchment area but If there is a catchment area it would be included in the schools admissions guidelines for that year.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:02 am 
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When my DS sat the Kent test as an OOC child, he did it at a test centre on the Saturday and said that there were home schooled children there. All of them did the English part of the test - so all four in one morning. It is quite an epic. You also get to do a 'dry run' the Saturday before which is useful to get used to the room/format etc. It is worth thinking about tiredness though - mine ended up doing three Saturdays in a row and was pretty tired by the last one, which was our most important one. Good luck


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:56 am 
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Not in Kent, but two of my home educated children are now in grammar schools, and a third sat a test this week. I just applied directly to the schools as everyone else did, and online applications on the council website. Perhaps things work differently in Kent, but surely out-of-catchment refers to where you live, rather than where you go to primary school?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:34 am 
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If you don't go to a Kent state funded primary school, or an independent school that has been permitted by KCC to hold the Kent tests, then you go to the test centre like everyone else who does not go to a Kent state funded primary.

This year the Kent 11 plus is changing so that everyone will be doing it in one morning whether at a "test centre" or at their Kent state funded primary school or in a private school permitted to hold the Kent tests.

It will be two mixed up multi-choice tests of approx 45 mins each, and then, probably, as before a writing piece which is only considered if you are a borderline fail.

Being homeschooled should be a big advantage as once we have some notion what the test is (at the moment we just know that it is maths, reasoning of some sort, and literacy of some sort, all multichoice and could be provided by GL assessment or CEM) you will have more time to get ready for it than someone who has to go to school all day every day.

You just apply like anyone else. The only thing that could be different is this headteacher review thing before the results come out ... you don't have a headteacher so presumably you are not entitled to that stage.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:09 pm
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Hi, my DS did the Kent test this year and has never been to school. We sat with the OOC candidates and did the tests all in one go. Instead of a headteacher appeal we were told we could provide a folder of work to be considered at that stage should it be necessary. I have to say I've loved home edding but feel rather disadvantaged should things come to it as we have no formal SATs tests and no CAT results to offer. I'm not sure how much of my sons work will actually be of any use at all! My older DC is at grammar and luckily didn't need the folder to be considered. On the plus side there is time available to prepare for the test as long as you have a willing child. Dc2 is not that eager to please so only time will tell!


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 9:38 am 
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Thanks everyone.

Iceskatingtracing: Did your son and the OOC children have to do the creative writing element, which would normally be a 'decider' if they were borderline and at school in Kent?


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 10:50 am 
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All children, including OOC candidates had to do the creative writing exercise, regardless of whether it is relevant for their mark or eventual admission.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:05 pm 
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Yes Azure he did and as far as I'm aware it is looked at in the same way as a non home schooled child if needed.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 9:45 pm 
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Thank you. It was only after I posted my reply and started cleaning the house, thinking about this thread, that I remembered you'd said that DC's work at home could be taken into account as supporting evidence! Thanks for your help.


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