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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:26 pm 
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Does anyone know if the pass mark will be lowered to reflect the early test date and therefore the missing term of tuition.....

Having just successfully appealed for our daughter and she is now happily going to the school she wanted (failed the maths by 2 marks) - it is now my son's turn and he has only just turned 10 which is seems like a big disadvantage in terms of his maturity in deciphering some of the more tricky questions -

I have heard a rumour that the pass mark could come down but its probably only a rumour....

Anyone got any insider info!!!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:48 pm 
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It will depend on the quality of the cohort. I would imagine there would be slightly more allowance on the standardisation as many more will be at an age disadvantage than last time. But this may be just a couple of points. It will be interesting to see. For the past few years, at least, it has panned out at about 50% raw score for a pass. I would doubt it will go higher than this but who knows!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 7:23 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:18 pm
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Location: kent
I'm afraid I don't really understand the question. The 11+ in Kent is about finding grammar school pupils who are in the top 25% of the population as a whole on ability . The "raw score" to pass will vary from year to year anyway as the papers are different each year. So really when the test is sat is an irrelevance.

However, assuming that all the papers were of equal difficulty to last year, and the cohort sitting the papers had the same spread of IQ / ability, one would expect the "raw score" (i.e. percentage of questions answered correctly) to "pass" to be lower than last year as everyone is sitting it earlier........ but that may not be the case if everyone has just prepared earlier.

Good luck.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 12:28 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:21 pm
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Location: Medway/Kent
Interested in the opinion that a raw school of 50% will get a pass, does anyone know if this is correct?
reddebs


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 1:13 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:28 am
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Location: Kent
Reddebs,
The 50% pass mark info is on the Judd School website, pg 10 in the prospectus inserts. http://www.judd.kent.sch.uk/Documents/P ... 202008.pdf


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 6:12 pm 
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reddebs - I have just replied to your PM but to anyone else interested, the Judd info is correct for the last few years. I know this from finding out my eldest son's raw scores in 2007 and they were very much in line with the Judd info. As an example, he got 76% correct on his NVR and got a score of 140. This was uncharacteristic of him as this was his strongest subject, so was obviously very nervous on the day as his heart was really set on a particular school. However, some will not be so affected by nerves, like my second, who doesn't seem to care if he passes or not! He would be just as happy with our non-selective choice. However, he is getting just over half correct, so could still have a chance of passing on the day.

As there are a lot more borderline children taking the test this year, it may change these percentages, but I would imagine there would be a touch more leeway if anything.


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 Post subject: perplexed
PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 7:47 pm 
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Location: kent
I don't really understand why you say that there will be more "borderline" children this year. And indeed if there were more "borderline" children, why would this affect the raw score cut-off mark for the top 25% children the test is used to identify.

It is possible that the earlier test my results in a lower raw score "pass-mark" ------- but only assuming that people have not prepared earlier for the test, and that the test is of the same difficulty as last year, and the IQ spread of the cohort is the same as last year.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 2:16 pm 
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I think my assumption that there will be more borderline children arises from the fact that the primary schools (certainly our old school that has a lot of borderline candidates) have actively encouraged more of those children just to have a go. However, they were always very cautious in the past about recommending a child to sit the test, especially if it was very likely to result in a wasted choice on the CAF. It is just the general impression that I am getting from the majority of local schools where numbers taking the tests have noticeably increased. I would imagine the big increase in numbers is from those who may not have taken it so seriously before.


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