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 Post subject: Imperial measurements
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:57 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:06 pm
Posts: 21
Do kids still need to learn about imperial measurements these days?
We've come across some imperial measurement questions in the Bond practice assessment papers. However my son (year 5) says they haven't covered this in school yet.
So much for the grammar school headmaster's "you don't need to hire a tutor because we only cover things they've done at school" speech - or has my son just got a bad memory!?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 8:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
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Location: Chelmsford and pleased
It depends on your area. They are not necessary for Essex, but I believe they are necessary for some areas.

I would recommend for general knowledge a rough guide to conversions between the two systems.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 8:30 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
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Location: caversham
They are part of KS2 maths as an appreciation of another measuring system. The problem is how long is a piece of string. :)

I think the key ones are, kilogram to pounds, meters to yards(feet) and pints to liters. Followed by kilometers to miles, etc. Generally expressed in real life terms, so a two meter door is about six foot, a bag of two pounds of sugar is about a kilogram, a litre of juice is about two pints.

Have been working on this the last few weeks with DS2.

Search for ks2 imperial units. It will only be a small part of any balanced test, one/two questions out of fifty, so don't stress, but every mark helps. :wink:

steve


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 1:34 pm 
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they're in my son's Y8 maths books (the framework series from Collins) but with very rough and ready approximations - a metre "equalling" 3 foot, whereas we all remember the rhyme that a metre measures 3 foot 3 (it's longer than a yard you see). These supposed equivalancies (sp?? looks odd, maybe not a word :shock: ) continue into weights where it seems a pound "equals" 500g. Very slack, methinks.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 2:44 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
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Location: caversham
You will like this :lol: I think it goes into to much detail.

Quote:
Imperial units of mass
Ounces and pounds are old units of mass. These are known as imperial units but are not now commonly used in maths.
There are 16 ounces in a pound.
An ounce is roughly equal to 25 grams.
A pound (454g) is equal to just under half a kilogram (500 g).



http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesiz ... ead1.shtml

steve


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 2:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2008 1:25 pm
Posts: 2556
what worries me though is in tests if he is expected to base his answers on erroneous facts (the old metre being a mere 3 feet) just because that is what he has been taught??
Give me 454g any day - doesn't everyone naturally count in 454s?

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