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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 4:39 pm 
can somebody forward me to the exam rules on 11 plus for the mathematics paper, I need to know whether you can use a calculator, I've checked all over the web and I cannot find the exam rules.

I would be grateful for a reply.
Thanks
Jag


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 4:42 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 11:55 am
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Sorry, definitely not!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 4:47 pm 
thanks for replying, i'm helping my niece out for her 11 plus in october, and some of the questions are difficult to answer without the aid of a calculator.
Are there a standard way to work out multiplications and divisions manually? simple calculatations are not a problem. :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 5:28 pm 
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My daughter just used what I would term the old fashioned way. i.e. long multiplication. No messing about with those grid things or whatever they use nowadays. I also taught her long division. If she learns her times tables up to 15x that really helps with some of the maths type VR questions as well. It also depends on whether the exam is multi choice and set by NFER or bespoke. It might be worth posting on your areas part of the forum and finding specific info for the area or school you are interested in.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 5:46 pm 
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Location: Berks,Bucks
Assuming that the tests are NFER, I agree with Nou. No calculator and being able to count quickly and accurately is vital. The traditional long division and multiplication methods are faster and more accurate than the new methods.
If you need help on how to introduce them to your niece, you can use some maths practice books like the 'AE Tuition maths practice workbooks (book 1 or 2 not sure)'


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 Post subject: Calculations
PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 5:50 pm 
I do agree about the importance of times tables. My child's school is very hot on the times tables and because my son is so fast at them(up to 15) he can work out maths problems very quickly...providing he has read the question correctly!!! It saves a lot of time during the real exam as you dont waste time recalling the times table. Also it helps to 'see' number patterns in VR and word problems sums.

It also helps to know your squares(up to 15 ) and cubes(up to 10)
Once the child is super fast at times tables, long multiplication and division is a piece ok cake!

Also reducing fractions to make the original calculation simpler...some work also with decimal division 0.6/0.5.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 7:52 pm 
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Please don't reject the 'grid thingy' - it can be faster than the old fashioned method and links into algebraic multiplication and division! I have used it to teach division of algebraic terms at A level which is traditionally very difficult to understand.

I heard on the grapevine that at a certain Grammar school recently some Y7s raced their teacher to complete some multiplications set by the teacher and the pupils won using the new methods....


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 9:50 pm 
Yeah , whatever rocks your boat!!

My child does a lot of his work in the new method/grid/chunking etc.
we do race each other and he often wins because he is faster at his tables than I am..who knows 14x15 faster than a child who wants to beat mum?

He also does oldfashioned div and multiplication depending on what type of sum he gets..

I think as they get more confident,children tend to pick what suits and if there is a competitive edge to it,they'll always find the fastest route!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 9:56 pm 
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Thanks, that never occured to me. I suppose I am old fashioned and set in my ways. Actually I have been recently looking at alternative methods to help my younger dyslexic child - you are right we should not dismiss methods out of hand - what works for our child is best. I think at the time I annoyed was that my elder daughter had not been taught the traditional long multiplication method, and the grid seemed longer and with more potential for mistakes.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:31 pm 
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It is difficult to evaluate the 'new methods' when we all probably succesfully coped with the other methods.

However I have worked with adults who can't use the traditional methods and the 'new' methods seem to release them from their 'maths demons'.

I agree that children should be taught a variety of methods and be flexible - but the traditional method of long multiplication does not link to expanding brackets and factorising in the way the 'new' method does. It also promotes algebra as generalised number not just a strange thing that mathematicians do ...

Sums are now set out horizontally on exam papers [KS2, KS3 and GCSE] to emphasise that any method is OK.

e.g. 1000 - 827 not one number under the other


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