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 Post subject: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 3:53 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:36 pm
Posts: 35
Esp for those of you maths teachers...

This is probably an old chestnut, but a quick search didn't reveal a focused tread on this.

DC school held the optional SATs for Year 4 and just got the result this week - DC scored 4b apparently. DC said the questions were very easy and finished it in less than half the time allocated. He then spent the rest of the time checking and rechecking his answers 5 times over, so he said.

From the questions descriptions he gave to me, they were easy, so it seem possible that he should have got 100% correct. My question is, can a child get a 100% and yet get a 4b only? If not, what should the level be ?


Then came the twist; the teacher's own words - "he should be 4a or level 5, but Im keeping him at 4b for now..he should be moved at the end of the year or early Year 5 " Lol , I thought that was funny, I didn't press for her reasons for doing that; I just smiled thinking it could be because of ;

1. the administrative conundrum that it will cause in her year?

2. or is there really a real reason or reasons for doing it from a teacher's point?


Also, I thought it maybe its a good thing - I don't really want DC (and myself) to think he is so ahead as I clearly can see he is not - the paper was simply set too easy. So I'm carrying on with tutoring him - I know he has still a lot to cover. I'm thinking, it is so easy and dangerous to be misguided by these test / exam results, especially comparing to the Maths Level Targets (below).

I am also wondering, why is the test so misleading... or is it really that the majority of kids can't do these simple questions at Year 4? The teacher said he is in the minority 10%. It cannot be that bad is it?! I mean, this school is in an "leafy" catchment area with majority professional parents - I can see most are university graduates. Don't want to be seen as "delusional " here, but I am genuinely puzzled one way or the other. Grateful if you could help clear my head.

Anyway, below is an outline I got from another source (moderator - the acknowledgement at the end) . Is this still the correct guide or is there an updated one?

Thank you.

YCS




"Expected National Curriculum levels for the end of each year group are:
Year 1 1b/1a
Year 2 2b
Year 3 2a/3c
Year 4 3b
Year 5 3a/4c
Year 6 4b

1c

I can count to 10.
I know and write all my numbers up to 10
I know when I have written a number backwards and can correct it when it is
pointed to me
I can arrange numbers in order 1-10
I can add 1 to any number up to 10 and know what the answer is
I can take away 1 to any number up to 10 and know what the answer is
I can put two sets of numbers together and count to 10
I can continue a repeating pattern with up to 2 objects in it
I know 0 is less than 1
I know the meaning of plus, more than, less than.
I can name a circle, triangle and square.

1b

I can order numbers 0-20
I can add 1 to any number up to 10 and record my operation
I can take 1 away from any number up to 10 and record my operation
I can estimate how many objects there are in a group up to 10
I can add 2or 3 sets of numbers together up to 10
I can recognise the coins : 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p and £1
I can recognise repeating patterns that have 3 items in them
I know the meaning of: too many, estimate , before, next to, after and between
I can recognise and name rectangle

1a

I can write all numbers to 20 and begin to recognise a pattern as I do so.
I can order numbers to at least 30
I can partition numbers up to 20 into tens and units
I can work out a missing number from a simple sequence up to 30
I can tell which of any two numbers is the larger or smaller ( up to 30)
I know and use symbols + ( plus) and equals ( =)
I know the symbol – ( minus)
I can work out” how many I need to take away” from a number to leave me with a
given number up to 30
I can add two coins together and know how much I have got up to 30p
I know the meaning of minus and equal to. 2c
I can read numbers up to 100
I try to write all my numbers to 100 but sometimes I get mixed up with tens and units.
I recognise odd and even numbers up to 50
I can put numbers in order up to 100
I can partition numbers into tens and ones using arrow cards or blocks to help me
I know by heart all the number bonds that make 10
I can use + - = signs when I write down what I have done
I can add two numbers together using a number line (by counting on) up to 100
I can subtract by counting back on a number line from 100
I can spot and carry on a number pattern in ones and twos
I know which is the largest or smallest number in any given group
I can recognise a half and find quarter of any shape
I can put/use information that I have collected into a block graph
I can work out where a line of symmetry is in a simple shape
I can tell the time using whole hours using a clock with hands
I can record my sorting into simple lists and tables with help

2b

I can read and write all numbers up to 100
I can count on and back in 2’s, 5’s and 10’s
I can order number or amounts of money from the highest to the lowest or lowest to
the highest up to 100
I know what is meant by odd and even numbers and can recognise them up to 100
I can partition a number in to tens and units and add them together. I recognise 0 as
a place holder.
I can add two digit numbers, sometimes without apparatus. I know that addition can
be don
I can take a number between 0-9 from e I anna two digit number, without using
apparatus order.
I can double numbers to 5 and halve numbers to 10
I can spot and carry on a number pattern (going up or down in 2’s, 5’s or 10’s) from
any two digit number
I can halve numbers up to 20 plus( multiples of 10)
I can read the time to : o’clock, half past, quarter past or quarter to.
I know what a right angle looks like ( a quarter turn) I understand angle as a
measurement of a turn
I can use standard units of length, mass and capacity to estimate and to begin to
measure
I can work out “how many more” I need to add to a number to make 20
I know my number bonds to 20

2a

I can read and write all numbers to 1000
I can partition a number into hundreds, tens and units
I can choose the right operation to solve simple + - problems
I know by heart all the number bonds that make 100 (multiple of 10)
I can double numbers to 10 and halve numbers to 20
I know that X sign is a multiplication
I know that x2 represents doubling and dividing by 2 means halving
I know my 2x , 5x and 10x tables
I can share between 2,5, or 10
I know that multiplication is the same as repeated addition
I know that two halves or 4 quarters make a whole, and that two quarters and 1 half
are equivalent
I can use pictures of 2D and 3D shapes to describe their properties (number of
sides, faces, vertices etc)
I can recognise right angle turns and within shapes
I know £3 pounds and 45pence can be written as £3.45
I can total money to £10
I can measure using a ruler up to 30cm
I can make simple lists, tables and charts without help. I can use information from
graphs and charts where the scale is in 1.

3c

I can read and write numbers to 1000 and read number in the 1000’s
I can round two digit numbers to the nearest 10 and three digit numbers to the
nearest 100
I can count on or back in 1’s, 10’s or 100’s starting from any two or three digit
number
I can recognise and continue sequences (in 2’s 3’s 4’s 5’s or 10’s) from any two digit
number
I can count back in 2’s from any two digit number
I can double or halve numbers to 100
I can add three 2 digit numbers
I can subtract a two digit number from another as long as there is no exchange
involved
I can use a calculator to check my addition and subtraction
I know that the – sign is a division symbol
I know most of my 3x and 4x tables
I can find the simple fractions (half or a quarter) of numbers or pictures
I know that less than 0 is a negative number
I can use simple co-ordinates to identify a square on a grid
I can estimate and measure lengths. I can read a scale to the nearest mark
I can read the time to the nearest 5 minutes
I can draw and interpret graphs with scales that are in 2’s

3b

I can read and write numbers in thousands
I can round numbers to the nearest 10 or 100
I can add or take away involving negative numbers set out on a number line
I can recognise negative numbers on a thermometer
I can add any amounts of money set out in decimal form
I can subtract any two digit numbers from another using decomposition (exchange)
when necessary
I know division is just like repeated subtraction
I know the division facts for the 2,5,and 10 times tables
I know my 3x and 4x times tables
I know and understand why division problems often have remainders
I can count on and back in steps of 3,4 or 5 from any number
I can recognise and name fractions such as half, 1 third, quarter, 1 fifth and 1 tenth
I know what is meant by the signs < and > and can use these to compare numbers
I know that a straight line is equivalent to 2 right angles
I can classify and describe regular and irregular polygons
I can suggest suitable units and equipment to measure length , mass and capacity
I know the units of time and the connections between them (seconds, minutes ect)
I can use this year’s calendar
I can construct and interpret sorting diagrams with 2 criteria
I can draw and interpret graphs with scales in 1,2or 5’s

3a

I can write out numbers that are said to me in tens or hundreds or thousands
I recognise negative numbers and can position them on a number line
I know that two halves and four quarters make a whole, and that two quarters or
three sixths is a half
I can recognise and name fractions such as ¾ 2/3 and 3/10
I know that ½ is the same as 0.5
I can add 2 numbers together that have one decimal place
I can add two simple fractions
I can work subtractions involving Hundreds, tens and units
I know my entire 2x, 3x, 4x, 5x, 10x, and most of my 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x times tables
I can recognise two digit multiples of 2, 5, 10 and three digit multiples of 2,5,10,50.
100
I know what a square number is and know and recognise them all up to 10 X 10
I can find the pairs of factors of any number to 30 and know all my prime numbers to
30
I can divide numbers with remainders and understand the result
I can recognise equivalent fractions and mixed numbers
I can visualise 3D shapes from 2D shape in a mirror line parallel to one side.
I can read and plot co-ordinates in the first quadrant
I can read a 24 hour digital clock and tell the time on any analogue clock.
I can read simple timetables and use calendars

4c

I know how to read and write numbers to 1,000,000
I can apply a quick method of multiplying by 10 or 100
I can work out 10%, 25% or 50% of numbers and know their connections to
fractions.
I understand percentage as part of 100
I can add or subtract with thousands to 2 decimal places
I know my multiplication tables to 10 x
I can multiply two or three digit numbers by any two digit number
I can use a calculator to check all multiplications and division operations
I can check my answers using the inverse operation
I can work out number sequences and explain them to another person
I can use estimation when trying to work out whether my calculation is likely to be
correct
I can work out what needs to be added to a fraction to make it a whole one
I can use decimals to write tenths
I can round a decimal to the nearest whole one
I can classify triangles
I can identify simple nets of some solid shapes
I can measure the perimeter and area of rectangles and other simple shapes, using
counting methods
I can identify acute and obtuse angles. I understand and can use a protractor to
measure in degrees
I can use am and pm notation
I know the equivalent of ½ ¼ ¾ and 1/10 of 1km, 1m, 1kg, 11
I can collect discrete data and record it in a frequency table
I can independently draw and interpret tally charts, bar charts and bar line graphs.

4b

I can write any number in words and or figures, knowing what each digit represents.
I can use decimal notation for tenths, hundredths and thousandths and know what
each digit represents
I can work out the relationship between percentages and fractions
I can multiply and divide any whole number by 100
I can add and subtract numbers up to 10000 on paper
I can estimate answers before multiplying and dividing
I can solve multiplication problems, TU x U, HTU x U and TU x TU
I know what to do with a remainder in a word problem
I can order a set of mixed numbers
I can recognise all squares to at least 12 x 12
I can recognise prime numbers and find all prime numbers to 100
I can use all four operations to solve problems related to money, time, weight or
capacity
I can find the mode, median and range of any set of numbers
I can classify according to degree of likelihood (impossible, unlikely, possible, certain
etc) I can construct rectangles, squares and right angled triangles using set squares and
rulers
I can recognise all lines of symmetry in a shape and sketch a reflective pattern
I can recognise where a shape will be after a translation
I can find the difference between any positive and negative number or between two
negative numbers
I can construct triangles using a ruler and protractor, draw lines to the nearest
millimetre and angles to the nearest degree
I can complete symmetrical patterns with 2 lines of symmetry
I can use and interpret co-ordinates in the first quadrant
I can convert up to 1000cm to m (vice versa)
I am efficient when choosing and using a range of appropriate scales

4a

I can order, add or subtract negative numbers
I can order numbers with up to 3 decimal places
I can multiply or divide to one decimal place
I know the word “inverse” and can check my answers using the inverse operation
I can order fractions such as 2/3, ¾ , 5/6, by changing each to a common
denominator
I can use a calculator to convert fractions to their decimal equivalents
I can work out a decimal fraction that lies between two that have a 0.1 difference,
such as 3.6 and 3.7
I can add and subtract decimal numbers on paper
I can use all number operations to solve word problems involving numbers in “real
life”
I can interpret a pie chart , using a percentage or fractions to describe proportions of
the whole set of data
I can use a probability scale of 0 to 1
I can calculate angles on a straight line
I can identify different nets for an open cube
I can recognise parallel and perpendicular lines
I can measure and calculate the perimeter and area of rectangles and other simple
shapes
I can construct and interpret simple line graphs
I can group data, with equal class intervals and construct graphs and charts with it

5

I can use a calculator to calculate percentages and fractions of quantities and
measurements
I can use a calculator to calculate squares, square roots and cubes of larger
numbers
I can multiply and divide by 100, and 1000.
I can use all four operations to 2 decimal places
I can carry out a long multiplication and division and check my answers on a calculator
I can round up or down to the nearest 10,100 and 1000
I can work out the missing value in simple equation involving addition or subtraction:
e.g. 2x-1 =7
I can use all four operations to solve word problems involving money including
conversations to/from foreign currency and percentage , such as VAT
I can apply formulae for perimeters and areas of rectangles and the volume of
cuboids
I can calculate the perimeter and area of simple compound shapes that will split into
rectangles .
I can use all four operations in solving problems involving speed.
I can convert up to 1000cm to m (vice versa)
I am efficient when choosing and using a range of appropriate scales

(Taken from - Roade primary website )

_________________
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Last edited by YourChildrenSuccess on Fri Nov 23, 2012 9:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2011 8:20 pm
Posts: 1706
Location: Warwickshire
YourChildrenSuccess wrote:
Then came the twist; the teacher's own word - "he should be 4a or level 5, but Im keeping him at 4b for now..he should be moved at the end of the year or early Year 5 " Lol , I thought that was funny, I didn't press for her reasons for doing that; I just smiled thinking it could be because of ;

1. the administrative conundrum that it will cause in her year?

2. or is there really a real reason or reasons for doing it from a teacher's point?
ds's school do this. Apparently it's because they have to show 2 sublevels a year of progress, but there's a ceiling they're allowed to report at primary level, so if they're ahead of schedule (i.e. 2 sublevels a year would put them above the maximum at the end of year 6) they'll report them lower than they are to ensure they can still report 2 sublevels of progress.


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:20 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2011 10:43 am
Posts: 160
From what I understand (and I hope someone will correct me if I'm wrong) those are very minimum expectations for each year group. i.e. ALL children should be reaching them. I think most children score above those so I don't think those are average levels as such.


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 6:04 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11956
The website you quote is its own interepretation of sub-levels: these are NOT accepted widely. The National system for Teacher assessment is APP (assessing Pupils Progress) and you should look at the level 3 to 4 assessment guidelines.

These optional tests are not well regarded and should NOT be used on their own. More importantly the last version is a number of years old and does not reflect the KS2 tests now.

I would take the level with a pich of salt.


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 6:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 12:24 pm
Posts: 160
I'm surprised by this... at DD school end year 5 she was 4a.... they didnt have a problem putting her at 5a in first term of y6... ie up 3 levels... but maybe she wasnt really


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 10:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:07 pm
Posts: 501
Agree with G55 - those level descriptors look easy. I teach Y5 and we are working beyond the level 4a description, but I wouldn't expect my entire class to get 4a in a test, now. It is a simplistic view. A child may be able to multiply and divide by a multiple of 10, or a 100, but can they use this knowledge to solve problems?

Also the tests are very old and there are 2 separate maths tests for Y4 (unless that's changed in the last few years) - one is aimed at the more able, but there probably aren't any level 5 questions in the test, so you couldn't use it to assess at level 5. TBH tests are not the best indication of a child's ability. They give a little snapshot and provide some evidence to back up teacher assessments.

Oh and BTW it is perfectly acceptable for pupils to make more than 2 sub-levels progress. That is average progress and I'm guessing Ofsted would describe it as only satisfactory.


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 11:32 pm 
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Posts: 3818
Location: Chelmsford and pleased
Not forgetting that 'satisfactory' is no longer satisfactory!


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 1:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:36 pm
Posts: 35
Guest55 wrote:

I would take the level with a pich of salt.


Thanks G55, yes I'm indeed taking it with a bucket of salt as I have indicated.

Here's what makes me wonder though, if the test papers were so easy, why aren't the rest of my DC's class - the 90%, not able to achieve a good, if not a high score (since his teacher said he is in the minority 10%). I know, test result is not everything, but I would have thought 90% should be scoring high with the easy papers, not the other way round. Is it not because they way the children are taught then? What does it says about the methods and approaches in the school? (I should say that this school is a very good school with "Outstanding" Ofted reports for years). Obviously then, my DC's ability has to do a lot more to my tutoring than the school's teaching?

Talking about "methods and approaches" I saw your other post;

"Guest55 wrote:
NOOOO! Please don't try to teach them unless you are a qualified teacher who is aware of the new KS3 demands and the new GCSE. Methods and approaches are very different.."

Are you saying parents shouldn't attempt to teach their kids at all?!

Thank you.


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 7:24 am 
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Posts: 6696
Location: Herts
Loveyouradvice did your dd go from 4A to 5A from July of Y5 to September of Y6? If so then it was nothing to do with the school. That is impressive in six weeks. OP There is a time when the interests of the school and the interests of your family diverge. They need to get as many students onto Level 4 as possible but your requirements are beyond that. I would ask your teacher to assess your child using a Year Five maths paper. I have a student who was given the Y6 Maths Sats paper at the start of Y5 and got 100%. This clearly told the school that he was beyond KS2, so now he is extended with KS3 material. DG


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 Post subject: Re: Maths Level Targets
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 8:48 am 
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Posts: 1706
Location: Warwickshire
Daogroupie wrote:
I would ask your teacher to assess your child using a Year Five maths paper. I have a student who was given the Y6 Maths Sats paper at the start of Y5 and got 100%. This clearly told the school that he was beyond KS2, so now he is extended with KS3 material.
Oh how I wish that was the case.

I have one who was given the Y6 Maths Sats paper at the end of Y4 and got 100%. This clearly told the school that he'd done all he needed for KS2, so now they don't need to teach him any more :roll:

When the school don't/won't (or maybe can't - his teacher freely admits that he's better at maths than his teacher is!) teach them then your choice is down to do it yourself, pay someone else to do it or accept that they'll not make any progress until they change schools. I don't really accept that as a parent with a maths degree, having read up on the currently used methods and working one to one, you can't do at least as good a job as a generalist primary teacher with just GCSE maths in a whole class situation.


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