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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 6:12 pm 
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-20678353

Acceleration isn't the answer ....


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 6:49 pm 
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It might be if one could achieve depth at the same time.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:00 pm 
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It wasn't acceleration when mine did GCSE maths early at all - there is so little in it that they were bored rigid with the turgid pace. OK they're good at maths but there should be much more on offer for those who are in the same position.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:01 pm 
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A good teacher will enrich the GCSE syllabus and make it fun as well ...


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:07 pm 
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Just read your post Guest 55 - Miss Magwich asks for examples of how the GCSE syllabus can be made "fun". Bit like saying a trip to the dentist can be made "fun"!!


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:23 pm 
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I've only got a few minutes so one idea is to work of if we can chop down a particular school tree without it hitting the HT's car!

Lots of ideas on www.nrich.maths.org - estimating pi by dropping sticks, how many packets of something so I need to buy to collect all the free gifts.

Obviously her teachers are not very creative!


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:27 pm 
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Quote:
Ms Pope cautioned against limiting the enriched curriculum to the ablest pupils: "There is quite a lot of evidence that no matter who your learners are, they all need challenges. All children will be more engaged if they manage to complete a task they didn't think they were capable of."


Challenges are fun and can see if you understand maths by applying it. I think the Nrich maths puzzles are a bit like that. (Oops, crossed posts a bit).

I still argue that there is a difference between able children being taught more quickly to achieve certain test standards, and those who have a natural and thorough understanding of maths. I've got one of each and there is a difference.

_________________
The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn, the more places you'll go.
Dr Seuss


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:04 pm 
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Location: Warwickshire
My dd, who is probably "average" at maths, would give up if she met a challenge, saying she just "could not do it". I don't think that is the answer for dc like her. Bribery might work; her nonselective school have actually introduced a challenge for anyone, something about the size of an extension they are having, with a reward - she is interested now. Without the reward (something like a £10 voucher, that's all!), she wouldn't bother.

No offence, JRM, I feel a challenge would only work for my dd if it was either very interesting and she understood it. Otherwise she would just switch off.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:05 pm 
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Location: Chelmsford and pleased
G55 - I just love Sue!


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