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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 12:48 pm 
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Do the DC's need to know the perimeter/area of Parallelogram, Rhombus, Circle and Cylinder ? I thought perimeter/area of rectangle,square and triangle was enough.

This is for CEM (round 1 in some schools).


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 1:00 pm 
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I don't think it is required for CEM.

I would still suggest there is no harm knowing calculation for:
Circle (to calculate if the formula is given and Pi is assumed to be 3).
Shapes where more than one triangles are joined.

Cylinder - defo no.


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 1:24 pm 
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Thanks parent2013. So is this more a stage2 preparation (supers electives) ?
Can they not use 22/7 for Pi ? Just that my dd is biased towards fractions than decimals :-)


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PostPosted: Thu May 15, 2014 12:12 pm 
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I think it is worth knowing the formulae for circle and parallelogram in addition to square, rectangle and triangle. I remember seeing some questions on area of parallelogram, but for circle, the formula was given. 22/7 can be used for pi value.


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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 9:45 am 
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One of the tests had a question on area(cross section),volume and length of a prism. Whilst they are not difficult to solve DCs(at least mine) can find the terminology (cross section) confusing.


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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 1:50 pm 
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Volume of a prism - no way... :shock:

Could you please tell which test has it? I have not seen that in any of the material and won't be surprised if this is from mock paper providers.


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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 3:36 pm 
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parent2013 wrote:
Volume of a prism - no way... :shock:

Could you please tell which test has it? I have not seen that in any of the material and won't be surprised if this is from mock paper providers.


Check out FPP Numerical Reasoning Book 1 Test 6 Q 4. It was the first page I turned to that had it in, but I've seen others in at least this publisher, if not others.

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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 4:02 pm 
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berks_mum wrote:
One of the tests had a question on area(cross section),volume and length of a prism. Whilst they are not difficult to solve DCs(at least mine) can find the terminology (cross section) confusing.



I have not see any of these questions even in the super-selective independent school papers (including MGS, Habs, St. Pauls, etc)

Circle formula is given if there is a question involving circles but child should know what the terms diameter and radius of a circle mean and what their relation to each other is.

Parallelogram can come up but the child should be able to work out the area without knowing the formula - they can cut it into 2 triangles and a square/rectangle in the middle (compound shape made up of 2 triangles on either side of a square/rectangle). Once they can see this, working out the area is easy using rectangle and triangle formulae.


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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 4:13 pm 
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As fat bananas said, Book 1 (short maths) of FPTP Numerical reasoning has this question. I will again check the book to see if it is repeated in other tests.


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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 4:36 pm 
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My copy does not have a shaded face so I presume it is the base/top, looking at the answer. It does have a pentagonal prism as shape C but there is no way a child of 10/11 will be expected to know the formula for the volume of a pentagonal prism.

Maybe a better method to teach a child would be Volume is always the area of cross-section X height whatever the shape

I have never seen similar questions in any other papers including the super-selective problem solving papers - they will always give formulas for anything harder than volumes of cubes, cuboids


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