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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 2:10 am 
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My DD is in Year 2 and able however I feel that she needs to cover some of the basics in Maths using a step by step approach.

I have heard that the Bond No Nonsense series are good for covering the foundations. Is that true? Has anyone used these books? Can anyone recommend books to help TEACH my DD national curriculum Maths?

Many thanks


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 7:37 am 
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It's very unlikely any books have been revised to match the new National curriculum.

There are lots of fun things you could be doing at home and look at the stage 1 (KS1) curriculum maps on NRICH here:
http://nrich.maths.org/8935

Maths is all about solving problems ... for example, how tall will my sunflower grow?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 7:54 am 
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I suggest going along to WHS or Waterstones with your daughter and looking at the revision guides in the education section. Pick ones that you like together.

I used Letts revision guides and workbooks, but CPG do similar ones. It is important to get the workbook as well as children learn more from doing than from being told. Also get a pack of colourful crayons and a pad of graph paper so you can scribble more questions as you go through the revision guide to make sure she is getting it. I also used to repeat sections two or three times as going over it a day or two later gets it from short term to long term memory and also takes the pressure off the child having to feel like she has to get it first time through. I then used to let my daughter do the corresponding sections of the workbook alone as the ability to work independently is also important. The main thing is to keep it fun and stop as soon a the child wants to stop.

If she wanted to do something different, my daughter also used to do a page from the Letts Mythical Maths book. This is a series worth looking at as a supplement. She also did Khan Academy if she wanted to do something on the computer. I would also search Khan academy videos when there were bits of maths I was struggling to understand.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:00 am 
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russet - Khan Academy is American and does not use the correct methods for this country - it is not recommended by maths teachers.

There is no need for such a formal approach in Year 2 ... have you seen the research paper I've posted before?

http://www.acme-uk.org/media/10498/raisingthebar.pdf


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:19 am 
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My own daughter loves maths, got A* GCSE at ten and passed for the JMC Olympiad also when 10, having got a silver in the IMC. I will revise my methods if and when they stop working, but until then will continue sharing them with others.

It is then for others to decide what they do or do not wish to use for their children.

There are those who believe maths is best taught through the medium of cooking or gardening or dance. I believe maths is best taught through the medium of maths.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:39 am 
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Read the ACME paper written by experts ...

Maths is problem solving - it can be taught through every subject -


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 9:41 am 
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Oh good. I seem to be doing a lot better with my child's education than the experts.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 9:52 am 
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Each child is different and therefore, 'your' method may have worked for your child but you cannot assume it can be replicated for others. Your daughter is still young and has not yet reached the age/stage when you can judge 'success' ... has she been selected for a UKMT summer school or their mentoring scheme?

Look up 'Ruth Lawrence' to see what can go wrong ...


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 10:13 am 
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This thread is now wandering off into the future career speculations for my child. All I can say is that from my experience, if you teach a child maths their maths will improve.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 10:26 am 
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It hasn't gone off topic - this thread is about ensuring a child is given the right educational experiences. I believe ACME's advice is more relevant here ...

In KS1 they should be exploring problems - problem solving in the real world - through every subject:

* patterns in music
* shapes/rhythm in dance
* symmetry in plants, objects and in art ....

Maths is as much about application as it is about a 'body of knowledge' [not actually fixed anyway] - new areas are developed through seeking solution to problems.


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