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 Post subject: money calculations
PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 6:10 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:58 pm
Posts: 144
Please can anyone help with the following:-

67 x £5.32 = £356.44

daughter got £37.24

can you please explain how to work this out so that I can relay to my daughter. Sorry if this seems really simple, but I just don't get maths at all.

Many thanks in advance


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 6:52 pm 
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not easy for youngsters but have to decide whether the answer is "reasonable" ie nearly 70 times £5 must equal somewhere near £350.

Otherwise to get the exact answer comes down to however you teach kids to long multiplication, I may be able to do the sum but couldn't teach anyone to do anything (other than medical students ho ho).

I'm sure a maths teacher will advise soon....


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:18 pm
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Location: kent
I think the best way is start from whatever method your daughter uses at school for long multiplication (it probably depends on what year she is in, but is most likely "chunking" at this stage). If she can't explain her method to you, look in her maths exercise book to see what they do.

There are also some very useful websites which tell you the sort of methods they use in primary school maths today. If you look in the maths section of Advisory Service Kent (ASK) on the KCC website you will find some leaflets they have produced which explain methods commonly used in school today.

Also, there are lots of books on sale in a big WH Smiths which cover KS2 maths and the kind of methods they use in school today.

Good luck


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:03 pm 
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Chunking is used for division - many schools use the grid method for long multiplication - this site might help:


http://www.mad4maths.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:15 pm 
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Location: kent
sorry did not mean to use the word "chunking" ..... I meant that method some primary school children use where they break it down into lots of easier multiplications that they can do and add them all up.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:23 pm 
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That's the grid method - I'm a fan as it links nicely to expanding algebra then later to factorising polynomials and completing the square.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:42 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 10:05 pm
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...


Last edited by Glos_Mum on Sun Oct 06, 2013 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:57 pm 
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Thank you all soooooo much!

The links are great.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 12:43 pm 
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It looks like your daughter worked out the 7 x £5.32 bit but forgot to calculate and add on 60 x £5.32.

To do this she would calculate 6 x £5.32 then put a zero on the end (because she's multiplying by a figure in the 'tens' column). She then needs to add the two figures together to come up with the final answer.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 12:20 pm 
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thanx feimala


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