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 Post subject: Tables.
PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:05 pm
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DD is only just 9, and takes her 11+ in 12months. Reasonably good at maths, except times tables. Significantly hinders her ability, and certainly speed, in doing maths problems of which she is otherwise well capable. Comments appreciated for any reasonably quick methods, even intensive rote methods, or useful internet sites, to reinforce these, so that we can get on and do more useful maths work in a more relaxed manner.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:56 pm
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There are loads on the internet. Have a browse and see what would suit your DD. Shooting things down? High score type ones? Timed or not? Too many variables to list!

A year to go is fine - and the fact that you are asking about it means that you are keen to support. They are, as you know, very important.

We have always done them on the way to school, at the dinner table etc. You need to think again about what suits your DD. My DS, for example, could never get the hang of singing or nursery rhymes so we NEVER learned them by that way. We didn't recite them either like they tend to do in school.

I started gently 2x 5x 10x then 3x 4x then 9x (easier than you think as loads of tricks with that one!) then 6x 7x and 8x. By the time you get to the latter ones, you've covered most of them.

In a testing session I always began with the easy ones then built up.

Over time I gradually introduced more and more until they were completely random and fired off the top of my head.

You need to remember the associated divisions. Very handy. Mix them all up to develop keen listening.

Good luck. You can do it!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:05 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2008 12:55 pm
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hi

does she have a NintendoDS? There's a useful 'Maths Training' game based on the 100 cell method the aim being that regular practice is done each day, and includes multiplication, addition, subtraction and division. It certainly helped my child quickly develop speed (and accuracy) and the daily test can be done in about 5 minutes eg at breakfast time each day.

hope this helps


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:23 pm 
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I think mum007 is right - everybody needs to learn in their own way. DD tended to do the singing bit jumping on the bed - ahem not sure if the bed was really up to .... I learnt through the chanted rote learning of the 60s (can't still see / hear the form...) - it worked for me but I am sure others would have preferred something different. Not sure what DS did - they just appeared in the memory one day. One thing though - I think that repetition helps, repetition helps, repetition helps, repetition helps...

(mind you a lot could get keen on the nintendo DS game - probably think it was cooool).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 3:45 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:29 pm
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Hi dadofkent

Start with a 10 x 10 times table

Cross off all the tables that are known i.e. 1, 2, 5 and 10 any parts of 3's and 4's.

Teach that 7 x 2 gives the same answer as 2 x 7 and cross out all reverses that occur
i.e. with 7 x 2 and 2 x 7 cross out one of them.

After crossing out all the known tables and the reverses the task of learning what is not known becomes easier.

Work on unknown tables by rote.

By filling short term memory with the same memory blocks 7-8 times then information is transferred to long-term memory, so slowly repeat

six times seven equals forty-two, six times seven equals forty-two, six times seven equals forty-two, (the same 4-5 more times).

Rote learning is dependent on the students ability to re-call, so check at random moments whether 6 x 7 = 42 can be recalled.

Next, randomise the 10 x 10 times table and get DD to complete and time DD on completing it. You can randomise the times tables often and look for faster completions. This indicates that recall is occurrring.

For all incorrect answers just go through the rote process again.

Once you are happy that recall is naturally occurring then randomly ask questions at diffrent times and in different circumstances.

Hope this helps

Regards

Mike


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 3:59 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:29 pm
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Hi dadofkent

To teach nine times tables.

Hands face down on table.

4 x 9

from left to right count 4 and bend over fourth finger.

The fingers on the left represent tens, the fingers on the right represent units.

There are three fingers on the left and six fingers on the right,
making 36.

Keep practicing through all the nine times tables.

Then in my previous post cross out all 9x and x9 questions.

Regards

Mike


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:54 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:46 pm
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Location: Bucks
Thanks Mike for the x table comments and especially the 9 x tables, I had forgotten all about that exercise, will remind DD, every little helps!

Ambridge


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:05 pm
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Thanks everyone for their replies. Have a DD who is determined not to learn her tables, and already had an idea about what needed doing and what to do. Lock her in her room and not feed her 'til she could do her 9X :wink: . (I remember I wasn't allowed to stay up and watch Z Cars until I did mine). So was looking for any ideas that may help, and ideally a quick fix. What I have done is downloaded the links to a few internet sites on which she can practice in her own time, whilst I will do a few sessions of more intensive rote practice with her. All I really need to do at this stage is to just get through to her how important it is to know the tables, and how much easier the rest of the maths becomes if she either has instant recall or, even better in my view, she can quickly devise in her head a suitable method. E.g 8x9 =9x8=9x4x2..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 9:43 pm 
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PS to the above. Also going to look into the Nintendo DS game. Anyone have experience of this.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2008 2:31 pm
Posts: 66
My husband uses a pack of cards to test children on tables. Get 2 packs of cards and play similarly to snap, each of you turning over one card and child needs to say answer asap. Can leave out "difficult" numbers to start off with - so one pack may have no 7s 8s or 9s for example. Decide whether to keep Kings in for 13 times table. Jokers could mean saying whole table in order, or Dad gets to choose the number. Can try without a time limit to start off with, then 10 second limit, then expect immediate answer.


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