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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 8:40 am
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Hello out there! Just joined and thankful for this place. I am tutoring my 10 yo daughter, and one of the types of questions she (occasionally) struggles with is what I think is referred to as the type 16. It's a sequence of paired letters. The one we just could not figure out was this:
BH is to YF as DJ is to _ _

Now that we know the answer - AH - I am struggling to see why A is the next sequential move. Here's my thinking:
B-H misses out 5 letters in the alphabet, going forwards.
Y-F misses out 6 letters going forwards in the continuous alphabet ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ etc
D-J misses out 5 letters in the alphabet going forwards, (therefore pairing with B-H's logic)
A-H misses out 6 letters in the alphabet going forwards - but why 'A'? Why is A the next in the sequence? What trends/sequences/relationships are there in the given pairs of letters that tells us the next step is to go to A? (I presume this 2nd pair needs to imitate the logic in Y-F's logic but can't see it for the trees and the fog and the red mist? :evil: )

Before I go stark raving mad, I would love some inspiration on this one. I'd also be very interested to know if there's a logicical strategy that I can learn and pass on to my daughter to help her do these when they come up.
Many thanks for any help!
Cheers
Chris


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:13 am 
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Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 5:44 pm
Posts: 357
I think it is
B to Y = -3 letters
D to A = -3 letters
H to F = -2 letters
J to H = -2 letters


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:20 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2011 10:04 am
Posts: 24
Actually what I saw was that there are two separate sequences here:
The B is related to Y and the H is related to the F

B's relationship to Y:
...WXYZABCDE... : sequence is count back 3

Similarly H is related to F by counting back 2
...DEFGHIJKL...

So applying that logic,
D would map to (count back 3 ) A and
J maps to (count back 2) H

So the answer is AH

What i have explained to my DC is that there can be two possible sequences, the obvious one and a less obvious one. I have found that when the letters are not "near" each other in the alphabet, there is often a less obvious association, so don't forget to look for that too.

Is this a question from standard format or multiple choice?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
Posts: 2660
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

BH is to YF as DJ is to _ _

They are always treated as 2 separate sequences.

1st to 1st of each pair and then 2nd to 2nd of each pair.

1st to 1st ... how do you get from B to Y = minus 3
Apply minus 3 to D = A

2nd to 2nd .....how do you get from H to F = minus 2
Apply minus 2 to J = H

Answer = AH

OR

B and Y are mirrors
Apply mirror to D = W

H to F still is minus 2, apply to J = H

Answer = WH

Mirrors tend to be used for both letters, however occasionally they will mix a mirror with the normal method.
I get my children to check the whole section before starting to see if any are mirrors [takes only a few seconds but saves heartache and time]

This question should never be used for standard format because there are 2 answers.

Patricia


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 6:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 8:40 am
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This has been fabulously helpful - thank you everyone for responding so quickly and helpfully.

Patricia, your explanation describes exactly how I had been looking at those kinds of problems, but on this occasion I couldn't see the wood etc.

Again, very helpful all of you - thanks everyone.

Chris


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 6:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 8:40 am
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Just realised that I've not answered questions:

Darell, it was from a Susan Daughtrey VR Further practice Exercises (11+) booklet. Not multiple choice.

And Patricia, interestingly my daughter put WH as her initial answer, but marked it as wrong based on the answer sheets.

My view is, FWIW, these tests should strive to have only one possible answer, as having 2 possibles undermines the credibility of the test itself. Not mentioning the frustration ambivalence can produce! But then we're not in a Perfect World are we? :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 6:28 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 5:44 pm
Posts: 357
You should read some of the discussions on here about some of the synonym and antonym questions! Some of those definitely have multiple answers!


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