Go to navigation
It is currently Fri Dec 02, 2016 8:13 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 3:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2010 7:44 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi everyone,

I'm helping a friend's daughter prepare for the 11+ this year and have just bought GL Assessment Pack 2 (this wasn't out when I tutored my own son a couple of years ago).

I'm just going through the papers myself first and have found a couple of questions that I really don't think are very good and am tempted to cross out. I just wondered what everyone else thought of these (apologies if they've been mentioned before and I've missed the thread).

Paper 6 Q12 (Closest in meaning)

(recent latter former)
(yesterday today tomorrow)

Answer is recent/yesterday.

So, this answer will contradict my advice in relation to previous practice papers that the words should be from the same part of speech (eg both nouns or both adjectives)

Paper 6 Q 14 (Closest in meaning)

(see look listen)
(hear noise sight)

Answer is listen/hear. I would have thought that see/sight were closer when used as verbs e.g. to sight a ship.

I also really dislike a couple of compound words on Paper 5:

'pigmy' (I know this is correct but it's a bit nasty as I think the more usual spelling is pygmy)

'lunchtime' (Is it definitely one word? My Collins dictionary doesn't have it but I notice the online Oxford dictionary does).

Any opinions gratefully received!!

_________________
Cassandra


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 8:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:22 pm
Posts: 710
Cassandra wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm helping a friend's daughter prepare for the 11+ this year and have just bought GL Assessment Pack 2 (this wasn't out when I tutored my own son a couple of years ago).

I'm just going through the papers myself first and have found a couple of questions that I really don't think are very good and am tempted to cross out. I just wondered what everyone else thought of these (apologies if they've been mentioned before and I've missed the thread).

Paper 6 Q12 (Closest in meaning)

(recent latter former)
(yesterday today tomorrow)

Answer is recent/yesterday.

So, this answer will contradict my advice in relation to previous practice papers that the words should be from the same part of speech (eg both nouns or both adjectives)

Paper 6 Q 14 (Closest in meaning)

(see look listen)
(hear noise sight)

Answer is listen/hear. I would have thought that see/sight were closer when used as verbs e.g. to sight a ship.

I also really dislike a couple of compound words on Paper 5:

'pigmy' (I know this is correct but it's a bit nasty as I think the more usual spelling is pygmy)

'lunchtime' (Is it definitely one word? My Collins dictionary doesn't have it but I notice the online Oxford dictionary does).

Any opinions gratefully received!!


I agree completely with pigmy and recent/yesterday. I always think of those 'closest in meaning' ones as being interchangeable, ie I went to the shop yesterday/I went to the shop recent. It doesn't work! I agree with the hear/listen one though-I can hear/I can listen.

I don't really like those GL papers-the second pack. There were some odd questions.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6962
Location: East Kent
Lunchtime as one word is quite common, hear /listen OK

but pIgmy is not spelled that way and recent /yesterday is just plain wrong!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 4:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 12, 2007 11:49 am
Posts: 450
Whilst I also dislike this question, both yesterday and recent can be adjectives:

yesterday (adjective)
5.
belonging or pertaining to the day before or to a time in the immediate past: yesterday morning.

recent (adjective)
1.
of late occurrence, appearance, or origin; lately happening, done, made, etc.: recent events; a recent trip.

A recent morning; yesterday morning.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 4:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:22 pm
Posts: 710
Y wrote:
Whilst I also dislike this question, both yesterday and recent can be adjectives:

yesterday (adjective)
5.
belonging or pertaining to the day before or to a time in the immediate past: yesterday morning.

recent (adjective)
1.
of late occurrence, appearance, or origin; lately happening, done, made, etc.: recent events; a recent trip.

A recent morning; yesterday morning.


But you couldn't say recent morning in the same way that you would yesterday morning?
You couldn't say a yesterday morning in the same way that you would say a recent morning.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 4:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 12:17 pm
Posts: 4
I completly agree with you!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8112
Tuyad wrote:
I completly agree with you!!


Thank you Tuyad... anything else you would like to add?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
Posts: 4580
Location: Essex
Cassandra wrote:
Paper 6 Q12 (Closest in meaning)

(recent latter former)
(yesterday today tomorrow)

Answer is recent/yesterday.

So, this answer will contradict my advice in relation to previous practice papers that the words should be from the same part of speech (eg both nouns or both adjectives)

Paper 6 Q 14 (Closest in meaning)

(see look listen)
(hear noise sight)

Answer is listen/hear. I would have thought that see/sight were closer when used as verbs e.g. to sight a ship.both are verbs



For what it's worth, I would just about agree with "recent / yesterday", as both imply "in the near past".

However, for the second question I would have selected "see / hear", both being verbs with a "passive" element (you can see or hear something without really paying it any attention) - as opposed to "look" and "listen", which are deliberate actions but cannot be the answer because the are in the same set.

"sight" I would read as a noun rather than a verb.

_________________
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2011 12:12 pm
Posts: 366
I definitely would not ever select see/hear in a 'closest in meaning question'. In an 'eyes are to (see, taste, touch) as ears are to (hear, smell, feel) yes. See and hear are not close in meaning. Aside of that, I don't like this question, as I can see why people would pick sight/see or listen/hear. But, listen/hear are both verbs, sight is a noun, see is a verb.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2012 1:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:28 pm
Posts: 417
All the questions you pointed out are terrible and I would tell a child not to worry if they got them wrong. yesterday and recent - who set that question?! Don't think I have done that set. Bit like the man is to trousers as woman is to skirt one... :roll:


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016