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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 8:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2008 7:45 pm
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Location: Watford
What is the most efficient way of starting to prepare children for these tests?How much time should one devote to each component of the test - e.g. verbal, non-verbal reasoning etc?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 6:19 am 
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Dear Ubuntu

It would be helpful if you could tell us which school/area you are applying for.

Patricia


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:02 am 
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Location: Watford
Hi Patricia

The general area is Hertfodshire. As yet the parents are still ressearching schools in the area. What they have told me is that their children will need preparation specifically for 11+.

Hope this is of use to you.
Thanks


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 3:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 2:02 pm
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Location: Herts
At the moment, the schools in the Herts consortium use standard (as opposed to multiple choice) verbal reasoning & maths tests. The official line is that no preparation is necessary. Many children are extensively tutored.

It sounds like you are seeking advice for a family who do not currently live in Herts. They should be aware that the schools in the consortium can only select a few pupils on academic ability (for the grammars and Parmiter's it is 45 places per school). All the schools are massively oversubscribed and, if you live in certain areas, your alternatives are grim.

I do not wish to sound too negative, but if I were moving area I would consider very carefully whether SW Herts was a good bet. But if the family are set on moving to this area I would urge them to seek out a part of it with good comps so they have a realistic "Plan B". My own DD was lucky but the agony some of our friends are going through at the moment is too awful for words.

T.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 3:27 pm 
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Thank you very much for the response - very helpful. Is there any evidence if children that have been tutored actually performing better in these tests?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 3:37 pm 
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Location: Herts
Of proper evidence I know not! But the two out of the five kids in my DD's immediate circle who "passed" were not tutored (incl my DD) - the other three were. Two of them for two years :shock: ....

Generally speaking I would think a child needs to be in the top 3-5% to qualify. A SAT level 5 performer in year 5, top table in all subjects, gifted & talented etc. No doubt kids who fall just a little short of this could be tutored up.

Another good way to secure a place at a consortium school is to be musical (most take about 18 kids under this criteria) or live close by - & I mean close!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 3:43 pm 
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Thanks very much


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 4:53 pm 
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From my experience you can familiarise a child with the types of questions and teach exam technique (particularly with how to answer the NVR) but the child needs to have the academic ability in the first place. I know of children that have had very extensive and intensive tutoring, only to fail 11+.

With the VR it seems to be worthwhile trying to extend the child's vocabulary. Some of the words used are not ones that most children come across in everyday speech or when reading books.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 10:02 pm 
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Location: Watford
Hi Sam's Mum

I fully agree with you regarding the vocab issue. So many children have really good academic ability and are fluent (speakers) in English, but they do not speak English at home. They have limited vocab - which isn't always evident at first - largely due to the fact that one or both parents speak another language to each other and to the child.

I am keen to hear views regarding preparation of E2L speakers for 11+.


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