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 Post subject: cut off marks
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:10 am 
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Joined: Mon May 20, 2013 12:29 pm
Posts: 76
hello
any body know and experience for pass standardised score and percentage about tiffin girls ,nonsuch and wallington girls?
thankyou
aram


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 10:25 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2013 5:36 pm
Posts: 120
For Tiffin Girls, the following was posted by helpful parents as the raw/scaled scores for last year. The number are "out of", "lowest" and "highest"

RAW SCORES
Reading comprehension: 60, 9, 42
Writing: 20, 4, 16
Maths: 50, 16, 50
VR/NVR: 160, 123, 157
SCALED SCORES
Reading comprehension: 30, 1, 30
Writing: 20, 1, 20
Maths: 20, 1, 20
VR/NVR: 30, 1, 30


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 12:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 20, 2013 12:29 pm
Posts: 76
thank you for give scores
aram


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 5:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 1:04 pm
Posts: 1186
Deleted.


Last edited by Ladymuck on Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2013 5:36 pm
Posts: 120
Either that or the marking is very stringent. Though it is quite incredulous that for a test supposed to be testing up to level 5, none of the kids (top 30% of probably an already above average group) got above 70%.

Probably goes to show that the school is testing way beyond level 5.


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 9:35 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:44 am
Posts: 269
Realistically they'd have to pitch it high or make the time constraints challenging in order for it to serve the purpose of distinguishing between the bright and the very bright applicants.

In any primary school, the entire top group in Year 6 will be of a level 5 standard or above (given that one third of children achieve a level 5 or above in their SATS results).
Tiffins are certainly not looking to identify those children - it is closer to looking for the very top child from each class - the top few percent.


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:07 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2013 5:36 pm
Posts: 120
London_Mum wrote:
Realistically they'd have to pitch it high or make the time constraints challenging in order for it to serve the purpose of distinguishing between the bright and the very bright applicants.

In any primary school, the entire top group in Year 6 will be of a level 5 standard or above (given that one third of children achieve a level 5 or above in their SATS results).
Tiffins are certainly not looking to identify those children - it is closer to looking for the very top child from each class - the top few percent.

Agreed. So, the school could say they are looking for level 6 students rather than level 5 as they do now and their tests are designed to test at level 6.


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:19 am 
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Posts: 269
I'm not sure where they'd stand with having to be seen to be inclusive if they did that though.
If they said the test realistically required applicants to be at level 6 standard, it would stir up the tutoring / equality debates again. Level 6, if not above and beyond the KS2 curriculum entirely, is certainly way beyond what most pupils will have covered by the end of Year 5 in an ordinary primary school no matter how bright they are.

In reality, most parents don't believe for a minute that being at a level 5 standard with no other preparation is going to be enough to get through but grammar school tests – quite apart from anything with nearly 2000 applicants and a national rate of about 30% achieving level 5 or higher, the numbers simply wouldn’t stack up. The schools themselves don’t seem to deviate from the level 5 message though and I have always assumed that this is because saying anything to the contrary would hint at the need for formal preparation for these tests and all the problems that causes.


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 12:09 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:00 pm
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Location: RBK
English Reading and Writing tests certainly seemed to be at above level 5. From our School, girls in the top set got marks in the range of 20-30 in Reading and 8-12 in Writing, even though they all got level 5 and few even were teacher-assessed to be at level 6.

I recall that TGS had originally stated that the 'tests would be level 5 and above'. The above could have been level 6 or 7, so obviously there was lot of anger and then the TGS clarified that these tests would be at level 5 to be achieved at the end of the year 6.

However, the marks achieved by the candidates suggest that (a) the tests were much more difficult than level 5; or (b) the requirements were not very clear; some candidates mentioned that Reading paper had 30 questions and they wrote one point answer to each question, but it seems that each question was of 2 marks and would have needed more than just one point answers. (c) or the marking was too stringent. Some informal comments were that these papers were marked by some senior teachers used to mark A level papers and perhaps that experience reflected in marking.


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 Post subject: Re: cut off marks
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 1:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2013 9:45 am
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Location: Kingston upon Thames
I have also heard from a few (including my DD who sat it last Autumn) that it was wasn't so much difficult to put an answer, but being precise and concise was very challenging. I suspect many marks were dropped for vague semi-relevant answers. I'm guessing the markers being used to dealing with KS3 and KS4 accuracy and quality probably marked tightly which really hammered the inexperienced 10 year olds.

You also need to remember that TGS had said very little about the format of the test, and as it was first time, most candidates were in at the deep end having never experienced any similar mock or practice paper.

It is also not normal for primary schools to teach comprehension to level 5 (or bordering level 6) during Year 5 (or start of Yr6). They tend to focus on writing (handwriting and punctuation etc) before moving to advanced techniques to improve quality.


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