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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 3:33 pm 
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In the last couple of years at Nonsuch, the lowest scoring "top 80" places to be allocated, have gone to pupils with a score of 345 and 342.

I'm trying to get feel for how many questions a child would have to get right/wrong to get a score around this level.

If there were 80 verbal reasoning questions and around 50 English questions, once the marks are standardized what is the total highest possible figure? Put another way, what is the maximum score an August baby getting 100% right would achieve? In past years, has the letter notifying parents of their child's mark provided this information e.g. 345 out of 400(?)

Lots of questions I know, but I'm trying to gauge whether 345 would translate as 75%, 80%, 90% etc...

Thank you.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:37 pm 
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In the last few years there have been 3 papers at Nonsuch though not just English and VR so the marks were out of 420 (140 each for VR, English and NVR).
This year, there are only be 2 papers at Nonsuch (VR and English) so there won’t be scores above 300. A few years before the 3 paper tests, Nonsuch had 2 paper test but in those days the two papers were VR and NVR (no English) and the scores to pass were around the 220 mark (presumably out of 280).
The problem with trying to look at historical data for Nonsuch is that they’ve changed the test, added to it and taken away from it numerous times in recent years and in that time they’ve also changed out of catchment numbers from 50 to 80 altering the qualifying scores there too.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:07 am 
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This thread should really be in Surrey section........


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:17 am 
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I've moved this to Surrey.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:22 am 
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Thanks loopylou. That's really helpful information and now it makes sense (well nearly!).

Thanks also Mitasol for moving it for me. It was my first post and I hadn't realized there were different areas - since receiving tiffinboys comment, I've been in FAQ's trying to work out how to move it!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:25 am 
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whataboutthisname wrote:
Lots of questions I know, but I'm trying to gauge whether 345 would translate as 75%, 80%, 90% etc...
Raw scores to standardised scores isn't a linear relationship, so you can't actually make a comparison. A score of 100 on a paper/section will reflect the average score - but that will be the same whether the average score is 20% or 80%.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:47 am 
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I am not a mathmatician but according to my maths, if the score to get in for the last two years was 343 and 345 (ooc) then this split by three tests would be an average of 115 out of 140 for each test which translates to around 83% on each paper. I have no idea if this is how they work it out but its how I have worked it out to compare when we have done tests at home. I have not standardised for age.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:06 am 
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I am not a mathematician either but from what I gather, the standardisation process means you cannot really use home testing scores to predict the outcome.

As far as I know, the 100 mark doesn't mean a child scored 71% in the exam, it means they scored the average for that exam. If a lot of very bright children took a relatively easy exam, the average score might be 80%. If a lot of very bright children took a hard exam, the average score might be 67% The children who achieved above and below the average on each test are scored in relation to the 100 mark for that paper and that age group so it is possible for example to score 140/140 without getting anything like 100% of the questions right.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:09 am 
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loopylou wrote:
I am not a mathematician either but from what I gather, the standardisation process means you cannot really use home testing scores to predict the outcome.

As far as I know, the 100 mark doesn't mean a child scored 71% in the exam, it means they scored the average for that exam. If a lot of very bright children took a relatively easy exam, the average score might be 80%. If a lot of very bright children took a hard exam, the average score might be 67% The children who achieved above and below the average on each test are scored in relation to the 100 mark for that paper and that age group so it is possible for example to score 140/140 without getting anything like 100% of the questions right.
Spot on.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:10 am 
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qwatche wrote:
I am not a mathmatician but according to my maths, if the score to get in for the last two years was 343 and 345 (ooc) then this split by three tests would be an average of 115 out of 140 for each test which translates to around 83% on each paper. I have no idea if this is how they work it out but its how I have worked it out to compare when we have done tests at home. I have not standardised for age.


As previous response, you can't translate it as % mark as you don't know the entire results.
that average 100 is based on the difficulty of the test and difference between 101 and 100 is based on the deviation + age .
You can guess the relational position(%) of your DC based on the standardization score.


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