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 Post subject: Age Standardised Scores?
PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:14 pm 
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I've got a late summer born boy & I'm keen to know whether the Sutton tests are age standardised?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:23 pm 
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The SET is age adjusted.

There is also an age allowance for the 2nd round tests for Sutton and Wilsons.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:27 pm 
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Thanks Ladymuck. Really sorry but I do not understand your abbreviations :?

What is SET?

Isn't the age allowance considered at the first stage too?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:46 pm 
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BlueBerry wrote:
Thanks Ladymuck. Really sorry but I do not understand your abbreviations :?

What is SET?

Isn't the age allowance considered at the first stage too?


The SET is the common first round (and the only round for ?Wallington boys') I believe.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:46 pm 
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SET is "Selective Eligibility Test", which is the first round test.

With the first round, enough children sit so that they can standardise by age. However fewer children sit the second round, and such a method would be harder to use. Instead they add a number of marks to the score according to the birth month of your child.

Sorry, I'm possibly being too detailed for your question. In short as a summer born boy he should see some adjustment for all test which he sits.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:50 pm 
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Super, thank you for your replies :D


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 7:46 pm 
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Does anybody know what happens to the scores of the children born in the middle ie end February/March?

Also, are the scores of the oldest scaled down? I've been told that nothing happens to the scores of the oldest and the ones in the middle. But then the children in the middle would loose out the most surely, which would not be fair.

Anyone with detailed knowledge?

Thank you!


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 8:59 pm 
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ddkx wrote:
Does anybody know what happens to the scores of the children born in the middle ie end February/March?

Also, are the scores of the oldest scaled down? I've been told that nothing happens to the scores of the oldest and the ones in the middle. But then the children in the middle would loose out the most surely, which would not be fair.

Anyone with detailed knowledge?

Thank you!


The normal way of doing age standardisation is to compare those with the same birth month. It isn't a question of 'adding' or 'taking away' marks; your standardised score will depend on the average raw score and the standard deviation of your 'sub-cohort'. Received wisdom is that the average scores of candidates younger within the cohort will be lower than those of the older ones, but it doesn't necessarily follow. Once the scores are standardised, a given standardised score is the same regardless of your sub-cohort, even if the underlying raw scores are different, so in theory you end up with more or less the same proportion of each sub-cohort at each standardised score as there is in the cohort as a whole.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 4:49 pm 
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Thanks ToadMum!

I am regularly stunned by how much more mature are the friends of my DD, who are 6-7 months older than her. It seems half a year makes a huge difference at her age. I have little worry about her intellectual ability but reasonable concerns around her maturity and focus.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 5:22 pm 
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ddkx wrote:
Thanks ToadMum!

I am regularly stunned by how much more mature are the friends of my DD, who are 6-7 months older than her. It seems half a year makes a huge difference at her age. I have little worry about her intellectual ability but reasonable concerns around her maturity and focus.


Interestingly, I am usually taken by how little I am able to guess where our children's friends birthdays fall with respect to theirs :) . On the whole, they all seem capable of being both amazingly sensible and pretty darn clueless and feather-headed. Often at the same time. Our DC are all teenagers, though, with one of them away at university so unless he is reassuring / unwise enough to mention it or post it on Facebook, we are not aware which quality has prevailed in any given situation.

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