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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:52 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 10:31 pm
Posts: 89
Location: North West Kent
For those of you who have read about me. Husband and I are both teachers at a local grammar school. We have two boys, one has severe autism and epilepsy and the other (who is just 10) is in year 6 in mainstream state.

He was never going to pass the 11plus :( Am insanely jealous of all you lucky people out there who get their children into grammar school as I know how good the education is and how hard those teachers work to get your children through the exams at the top end (year wise) of the school.

Anyway eldest boy has had an interview and assessment day at local indie and has been offered a place - we are delighted (he will be going down a year group as he is a vey late August birthday). He is starting after Christmas. The money is scary - way above what my husband and I can afford to pay out of our teachers' salaries so remortgaging will come into it. I have been saving and have about 2 years fees saved now so.... :shock:

Anyway thats it really...any advice as a newbie to the independent sector (I did go to an independent school myself)...any advice on bursaries for when we need them later on...anything really :) :)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:31 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2008 10:08 am
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Just to say congratulations to your boy, and also that it is worth the saving and doing without! I'm paying half of my GD's fees and tho she has only been there 2.5 weeks we are so pleased...in that time, she has done more written work in some subjects than my GS at a supposedly excellent comp. did all year. She loves all the opportunities for activities etc, and is generally a happy little girl, full of ambition to get good grades and enjoy school.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:52 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:20 pm
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Whooppee! Congratulations Regina and your DS!

One thing I love about indies is that they're very democratic, often taking a wide ability range and spending great time and effort at the bottom, not just the top. I'm sure it'll be worth it!

_________________
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 Post subject: Bursaries
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 4:06 pm
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Hi there. Bursaries tend to vary on a school by school basis but for your information I enclose the policy at my DD's independent school which I take to be typical.

"In an ideal world, the School would wish that the payment of fees would not be an obstacle to any able child, who would benefit from being at the School, from taking up a place. In practice, we are able to move significantly towards this position through the Bursary scheme, which is financed by the School Foundation Trust. This charity, established in 1998, uses its investment income and money from individual and corporate benefactors. The Foundation Trust is currently supporting some sixty pupils in the School.

Parents of any child who has been offered a place may apply for a Bursary if they feel that they cannot afford to pay full fees. Bursaries can be of any size, from a small proportion of the fee to 100% of the fee for parents who cannot afford to make any contribution. Inevitably, there are, each year, more applications for Bursaries than can be supported by the Foundation Trust, and decisions are made on the basis of academic potential and family circumstances.

Once a Bursary is given, this is generally held to the end of the stage in which it has been awarded - subject to parents’ financial circumstances remaining unchanged, their timely payment of fees and to satisfactory academic performance and conduct on the part of the pupil - but may be renewed for the subsequent stage. For example, a Bursary awarded to a pupil in Year 3 would remain in place to the end of Year 6; a Bursary awarded in Year 7 would remain in place to the end of Year 11.

Bursaries are considered in February/March each year and generally run from the start of the following academic year. Those wishing to apply should contact the Bursar before the end of January. The deadline for Bursary applications following the Entrance Examination at 11+ is two weeks after the publication of results.

Hardship

For pupils already at the School, at any stage of their education, Bursaries may be awarded in the case of unforeseen hardship. These are also considered in February/March but in exceptional circumstances the Trustees are willing to give consideration at other times"


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 9:07 am 
I'm really pleased for you and your son although sad that you have had little choice and chosen a route you may find very difficult.
Regarding bursaries, as your son is not academic the only way they will probably consider offering you one is if they see him as an asset to the school. Of course all children are assets to the school because they shape the ethos and culture but you know what I mean. So encourage him to be active in all areas - plays, music, CCF, community service for the school - and good effort and behaviour are a must.If he is an active member of the school then they would feel the loss of him not being there so there is more chance they would offer you a bursary. Obviously he doesn't need any pressure and no child is a saint but treating him like an adult and giving him these responsibilities should help him rise to the challenge. If he is particularly strong in a sport or instrument that he enjoys then give him opportunities to advance as schools always love to boast about such and such a pupil representing their school at county level etc.
If you have time, which given your circumstances must be difficult, try and get involved in the school. Be on PTA's or fundraising commities and try and turn up to lots of events as this will show the school that you are interested in supporting them and in turn they may support you financially.
Keep us all posted on how he is getting on! :D


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 9:55 am 
Any chance one of you could get a teaching post at the school? Many independent schools give very generous fee discounts to staff- including, I believe, support staff. (Have heard of up to 90%!!) Not sure if your son's school does this, but maybe worth checking out.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 10:00 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:27 am
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Location: Barnet, Herts
Congratulations to your son!
I too have a DC with autism and learning difficulties so I know the pressures on the family and siblings . My DS goes to an independent and is thriving in a way that he never did at state primary. The school will encourage him to do his best and his self-esteem will rocket.
Good luck!! :D


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 10:10 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
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Kent99 wrote:
Any chance one of you could get a teaching post at the school? Many independent schools give very generous fee discounts to staff- including, I believe, support staff. (Have heard of up to 90%!!) Not sure if your son's school does this, but maybe worth checking out.


always worth a try - can make a huge difference over the years!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 7:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 10:31 pm
Posts: 89
Location: North West Kent
Thanks everyone for your replies :D :D It was always our intention to place him in the year below his actual year group as he has always struggled in his current academic year - being the youngest in the year and also having a disabled brother has been hard on him. He is not overly academic but the school have said he is average for the year group he will be going into - this is great news as academically he has never got to grips with his 'correct' year group. He is extremely philanthropic and loves to raise money for charities (usually local hospices). He is extremely affable to adults (he is not a boys boy particularly though) and the school said he presented himself very well - we are extremely proud of this :) :)

I wish I had time to be on the pta but i work almost full time and have the other one to think of too - he is very dependent on us for care and safety and is unable to communicate his needs effectively.

Thank you all for your good wishes - I will of course be keeping an eye out to see if a job becomes available but I am aware of the departmental situation at the school and it looks very unlikely within the near future.

Thanks again all **** :) :) :) :) :)


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