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PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 12:11 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 2:06 pm
Posts: 27
Hi,
does anyone have any experience of or know roughly what kind of level a child should achieve in indie entrance exams to be awarded a scholarship?
For example can you get an indication from SATS grading in year 5/6 at primary school?

Thanks.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 12:19 pm 
How long is a piece of string?

It depends on the school that you are applying for but if it is an academically selective school then a child needs to be miles ahead of his peers if he is at state school. Some schools want an IQ based test to test for potential and some want to see the type of work a child produces in an essay. I think your child would probably need to be on the G&T register as a minimum guide although this still does not mean they are capable of a scholarship.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 12:45 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:00 pm
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Location: Wales
Hi Blue

I have anecdotal evidence that sometimes Indies don't just look for strong, across the board ability way above their peers. Sometimes if they see strong evidence of potential in a couple of areas then an offer is forthcoming.

My DS sat maths, english and NVR at one school coupled with some 'interesting' interview questions and was offered an academic scholarship. He was only on the 2nd table for maths at primary and just missed a 5 in his (assessed) maths SATS. He got level 5s for english and science. He finds NVR really easy and is very good at creative writing although his spelling and grammar are awful.

I think his offer was on the strength of his NVR and creative piece. Feedback also indicated that he gave answers in his interview that interested the school.

Edit: His reading age at the time was I think only +10 months, although since then it has really taken off.

HTH :D


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 9:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm
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Location: Rugby
My dd was really strong all round in year six with a marked tendency to take on positions of responsibility, Librarian's Assistant, Lunch time Monitor even Register Monitor - which meant getting into school 1/2 hour early every day. When she sat the entrance and scholarship tests for Rugby(which takes up a full day and includes two interviews with the Head of a Junior and Senior House, plus lunch in a boarding house) she was told very clearly by the senior girls (Scholars) who chaperoned her, that it was how well you came over in the interviews that really mattered!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:54 am 
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In my experience different schools approach it very differently. Some obviously engage in a very formal process. Others (DD school included) less so and rely more on hunches about who they think would particularly benefit from what the school has to offer.

What you need to consider is:-

a-How many scholarships are there? Obviously the fewer there are the higher the standard (all things being equal). All decent independent schools will provide you with this information.

b-What is their general standard? Is it super-selective or up against the siren voices of local Grammar schools?

Given that many scholarships are much reduced in scope these days apart from the kudos (and in my DD's school noone is told who has scholarships including the teaching staff) you may find the bursary route more rewarding. Again any decent school will be forthcoming about what options are available.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:08 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:34 am
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Location: S East
This very much depends on the age of entry.

Most of the comments above aply to 11+ entry. Most schools are happy to supply past papers.

Some schools, especially boarding schools will have a greater number of scholarships on offer at 13+.
For those, the schools usually havetheir own set of exams at a higher standard than the Common Entrance (and there is also a Common Academic Scholarship Exam for those schools who do not wish to set their own tailored exam).
Past papers for the CASE are available from Galore Park. Specific school exams from the past are always made available directly to the schools. Schools vary as to whether they will supply them to the parents, as they know that the schools use them as practice papers.

As regards the scholarships they are either awarded for a high overall average mark, or an obvious aptitude in a particular area.
Your target school should be able to give you a steer as to what a suitable overall result would be.

_________________
Exams are formidable for the best prepared. The greatest fool may ask what the wisest man cannot answer.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:11 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:34 am
Posts: 271
Location: S East
guest43 wrote:
Given that many scholarships are much reduced in scope these days apart from the kudos (and in my DD's school noone is told who has scholarships including the teaching staff) ......


If there is no money and no kudos, what is the point? :shock: :?

_________________
Exams are formidable for the best prepared. The greatest fool may ask what the wisest man cannot answer.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:23 pm 
After reading past points there is no way I want DS2 to be a music scholar - too much hard work/expectation and all they get nowadays is free instrumental tuition! :roll:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:36 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
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Location: Chelmsford and pleased
It is often easier for scholarship children to obtain a bursary. In some schools it is the only way at entry level.

DS's scholarship is in the form of a bursary, but he had to take 10 min VR and NVR tests (50 questions each) and maths and English papers. A week or so later he was called back for 3 interviews with the head + deputy, head of English and head of maths.

DD spent a couple of days at the school and was interviewed by the head three times. Once pre-scholarship and once for the scholarship and once for her French talent.
The process was entrance exam and activity day (easier than 11+), interview and tour by the head a few weeks later, invited back for scholarship and talents 2 months later. The scholarship required maths, English and science (tough according to DD). The talents required a project for each to be presented on the scholarship day.

We were offered a bursary after the scholarship had been obtained for DD. She told us that the school would be good for DD and that DD would be good for the school so she had spoken to the bursar on our behalf.

As it happened we didn't take up either place. But DD had a great time all in all and took up the flute after spending the day with a flautist.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 1:54 pm 
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Location: Rugby
I can only speak for Rugby on these points. Foundation Scholarships at 11+ entry (for day school boys and girls) they operate a policy where no scholarship is worth more than a 10% reduction to the fee, however, every successful candidate can apply to be considered for a means tested bursary to augment the scholarship and it can be worth anything up to 90% of the fee (as in dd's case). Entry to the exam is conditional on the candidate living within a ten mile circle centred on the chapel. No information is forthcoming about how many scholarships are available. Though it is interesting to note that in the present year 7 (G1) of the thirteen pupils, eight have scholarships. There is also no bashfulness about which children have scholarships. The school publishes a booklet for parents listing every pupil and noting scholarships etc.

The scholarship exam, like the entrance test, is computer run, a bespoke test from Durham University's CEM department. They are intended to be unique and immune to preparation so there is definitely no prospect to see a past paper. There has been recent mention that a sample test is available via the school web site - I have not been able to find it. Entry as a boarder at 13+ also offers scholarship entry from The Arnold Foundation. The numbers able to benefit from the latter are intended to rise significantly. The school web site home page has links to detailed information. Clearly not every Indy can finance scholarships in the same way. Ruby's founder made his wealth as grocer to Elizabeth 1st. His estate continues to fund local children's education many centuries later.


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