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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:05 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:47 pm
Posts: 2
I hope someone can help me with questions on bursaries... I was looking at the forms and information and they do indeed want to know every little penny you have in your savings/investments/overseas(?) etc., We are in a position where may be too poor to pay full fees but too rich to get generous bursary. We do have money in savings but that is only because we are practical parents who scrimped and saved and hardly spoil ourselves with luxuries. The money we have are for our retirement in the future or just in case one of us is made redundant, at least we got some money to fall back on so we really don't want to touch our savings. But now I am afraid we might not get bursary or a nice sum off just because of what we have in the bank.

The question is, how much is considered too much to qualify for bursary? Do they check your overseas account?

Don't get me wrong, we are not rich but just hardworking parents who have saved well over the years for rainy days and have staycations rather than exotic holidays. We don't drive flashy cars and live in normal house. Surely the bursary officer don't expect us to use up our savings? I am lost. Can someone help? Thanks! :shock:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:10 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:47 am
Posts: 3310
Location: Warwickshire.
Welcome to the forum.

I would imagine that a bursar has so many applications for bursarial support that they have to prioritise applications based upon need. I would also imagine that this would mean that savings would be taken into account. It goes without saying that it is important to disclose all sources of income and savings in order that the help goes to those with the greatest need.

I'm sorry if this isn't what you would want to hear.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 459
Location: Rugby
Dear somewhereinmiddle,
It is a big ask to expect any school to take on your loved one and finance their education. If it is at a prestigious school this is going to cost serious money. A pound of your money is worth a pound of mine or even the school's. I don't mean to be offensive but why do you expect to ring-fence your private life? When I set out to 'influence' my dd's best chances I risked everything. Having met many others who have done the same along the way, I know (as if I ever needed confirmation) this was the biggest single benefit I could ever give my child. It will keep me warm in my dotage even if I cannot pay the gas bill!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8113
Ed's mum is right, there are lots and lots of people after bursaries at present and I am sure that none of them would like to touch their savings!

However they have to prioritise I think and hence the amount of savings will come into it - even if you have been frugal to get them..

I think you have to ask yourself whether you really want to go down this potentially expensive route or if not you need to look at other routes that will keep the savings intact (equally important - our kids will have debts from university - they don;t want to be supporting us too) . I could probably afford senior school fees but would prefer to use GS and save the money it would cost me and put it towards University / retirement / a sports car (ha ha :roll: ).


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 9:31 am 
These savings will be taken into account and rightly so. I am in a position of not being able to afford a deposit for a house because every year we spend thousands putting our boys through top schools. Now some may say this is silly but it is our choice. It would be wrong of us to ask a school to let us have a free place for 2-3 years while we save for this deposit. The rainy day you have talked about is now and you have to choose if paying school fees is a priority. You may have lived frugally to save this money but other parents without savings live frugally each month to pay full fees.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 9:49 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:16 am
Posts: 6
I would love to be able to keep my very small savings account, and put my children through private education.
we live in a modest house, have a very old car, and don't earn a huge amount of money. I wouldn't dream of applying for a bursary! there are more worthy cases than us i am sure.
I have worked evening overtime for the last 6 years to save money, which can only be spent once. what I choose to spend it on is exactly that, a choice. My pension, good idea, rainy day..perhaps? new car? much needed! roof falling in money? always good for emergencies! Private education for my children?
Why should anyone be allowed a bursary, and still have spare cash?
if that's the case......Bursarys this way please.
:evil:


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 9:50 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 6:16 pm
Posts: 2113
I am sure that the original poster has realised that perhaps her hope was unrealistic by now.It is obviously an issue that stirs a lot of strong feeling but I am certain she has had the answer to her question now. :D


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 9:54 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 14, 2010 2:19 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Hertfordshire
I have to agree with Tipsy. Our plans to buy a house will be going on hold indefinitely so that we can save for our DD to go to an indie school. Although we are not high earners (both of us earn around the average national wage) we feel that this is a priority and therefore will make sacrifices and use our savings. This will be our "rainy" day.
If you have savings, you must declare them. That is the point of the forms, so that the school can assess your financial situation. I don't understand why you think the school should help you while you keep your nest egg? That doesn't seem fair to me :?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 12:23 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:24 pm
Posts: 117
Location: surrey
Like almost everyone else who has posted we have no savings, are middle- class, staycation vacationers, house nedds re-wiring, new kitchen, new bathroom, re-wiring.......... :P

If said DC is bright enough could you apply for a scholarship that is purely meant for the academically able and available on merit in this regard?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:16 pm 
I do have some sympathy. You are saying that you are not wealthy people but have been very careful over the years and have managed to save some money whereas you could have chosen to spend it (on a better car or house etc.) and would now qualify for more of a bursary.

Unfortunately there isn't anything particularly fair about the bursary system. I have a friend whose child has enjoyed a full bursary throughout primary and now secondary by virtue of the fact that my friend, while intelligent, made several wrong choices in life and is on income support; she has had the opportunities to rise above this income bracket but it no longer makes sense for her to do so as any extra income would go towards the school fees she doesn't have to pay..

But then there isn't anything fundamentally fair about the private school system, either. Basically people are paying (or not if they are lucky enough to have bursary or scholarship) for their children to have what is arguably a much better start in life than other children. I wouldn't dispute that some people sacrifice their own standard of living to do this but I don't think many people would dispute that, in a just world, all children would have access to the best education has to offer.

I think if you wish to 'buy' into the private school system, you have to accept its rules.


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