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 Post subject: Can they play catch up?
PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 5:30 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:15 pm
Posts: 483
Location: North Kent (surprise!)
Hi everyone

It's been in the back of my mind and thought I'd share my concerns with you all and get your opinions.

My daughter starts at a fab independent school end of August. There were 9 places for year 7 up for grabs and she was lucky enough to achieve a place. I am presuming that the rest of the new year 7 will be those that have come up from year 6.

My slight worry is that my daughter has come from a state primary school and will she feel behind with the academic work? For instance she has done very basic french partly as an after school club whilst I know the independent school teaches this in the junior school, will the year 6 curiculum be the same as state school so that she will understand the work in year 7.

I'm not too worried about her fitting in socially with most of the children obviously knowing eachother from previous school year, she is a really likeable happy girl able to make friends easily and she is not at all worried that she is going into this new enviourment without any of her old friends and she's so looking forward to starting. What I don't want is for her to stand out as not being capable amongst her peers which would dent her confidence.

I have not had opportunity to speak to the school about this yet as the "open day" to meet teachers etc is not until June.

Maybe I am worrying unnecessarily, my daughter has not expressed any concerns, good for her, but fellow forum members comments would be gratefully received by this immensly proud but slightly worried mum :(

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 5:45 pm 
She may be a little behind but should easily be able to catch up. She will also have the advantage in some ways because she will have had to attain a high level for entry at this stage. Girls who pass up automatically from the junior, whilst well prepared, are not neccessarily more able, it being harder to judge their ability when they entered. Don't worry.. it sounds like your girl is raring to go.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 9:45 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:15 pm
Posts: 483
Location: North Kent (surprise!)
Dear Guest

Thanks for your reply. You have a point about those automatically going up, i guess I had the naive view that those in independent schools were at an advantage and I never thought that i would have a child in independent school (my schooling was all through the state system) but hopefully you are right, my daughter should be able to catch up (with the schools support I hope) and once done find her natural place within the class ability.

Thank you for your reassuring words.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 8:46 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11932
You may find she is ahead in some areas e.g. mental maths and problem solving.

Also her IT skills may be better -


My experience of Independent school pupils in Grammar schools is that they have often been 'spoon-fed' and they are behind!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:58 am 
Guest55 wrote:
You may find she is ahead in some areas e.g. mental maths and problem solving.

Also her IT skills may be better -


My experience of Independent school pupils in Grammar schools is that they have often been 'spoon-fed' and they are behind!

Sorry, but that is such a tired old cliche. How on earth can you generalise like that.. met them all have you? or do you spend hours looking through the books of those you have? My experience of state school kids is that they say Aks instead of ask and speak in jamacan patois... just as silly. My private school child has not been spoon fed and is a computer scientist. My state school child is no less clever and still knows her way around MSN. Why must we set them up against each other so?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 11:00 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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Guest - you are lucky with your private school then it's not true where I live - and you are hiding behind a 'guest' label - a 'guest' [is that you?] said they might be behind - I just pointed out the other side of the picture - that's what this forum is all about.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 11:25 am 
Not really hiding...just cant be bothered to think up a tag... but you can call me Guest 1234 if that helps with identification, although i don't feel better recognised for it.
I was the guest that said her child might be behind because, having children in both sectors, I know for a fact that they cover more ground earlier in the better private schools. I also said it should not be a problem as it is no indication of talent. That a child entering at a later stage would have had to be proven in some way, while those rising through do not have to the same extent. That her child could arguably end up being more able than her new classmates regardless of material previously covered.

I think I WAS pointing out the other side of the picture, and with less prejudice for knowing the benifits of both sides first hand.

I don't think yah boo sucks is useful.
I don't think we should encourage our children to take comfort in the potential disappointment some other poor soul might encounter.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:17 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8199
Location: Buckinghamshire
Quote:
My experience of Independent school pupils in Grammar schools is that they have often been 'spoon-fed' and they are behind!


Hi Helen

This has come up before - I think you and I will have to agree to differ! :D

It is quite the reverse in the three private schools local to us Helen. The children in general have far greater academic maturity. They have been taught curiosity - not just to accept facts at face value, and they show a quicker grasp of new concepts.

Perhaps they aren't as "streetwise" as they have to be bussed around more by their parents, rather than walking to school, but there's time for that later.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11932
Guest,

How do you know I don't know the 'benefits' of both sides? You are making massive assumptions about me and my teaching experience -

I was trying to reassure the original poster that there would be some positives and that their child would be ahead in some areas - I stick to that opinion.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 1:26 pm 
Guest55 wrote:
Guest,

How do you know I don't know the 'benefits' of both sides? You are making massive assumptions about me and my teaching experience -

I was trying to reassure the original poster that there would be some positives and that their child would be ahead in some areas - I stick to that opinion.

Guest55
I think you will see from the response given by the original poster, that she was comforted by what I had to say. If you read it you will see why.
I do not expect you to change your opinion. Nor will I stop reacting when I read generalisations and prejudice directed at either community.
I am sorry if I have assumed wrongly, that you are not an educationalist who specialises in this field, or that you do not have children currently being educated in both sectors. I will gladly stand corrected.
My opinion is based only on my personal experience of a state comprehensive education that ended at 16, and the experiences of my equally clever children aged 10 through to 22, who I have supported through - variously - private, grammar, foundation and community schools.

1234


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