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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 7:42 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 8:37 pm
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I keep hearing how very much more independent they need to be in secondary, how they will have to be really organised and fully responsible for getting correct homework and kit into school on time.

But... he'll be starting the day an hour earlier, finishing an hour later, with ten times the homework he was ever set at primary, and increasingly complicated music pieces to practise.

Would it be unhelpful if I let him take a step back at home, and picked up after him a bit more than I have been? In Yr 6 at state school I've been encouraging responsibility for tidiness, but can't help feeling that with all the pressures and extra hours at the new school, a bit of babying at home might be the right thing.

How tired were your children when they started? Did they find the first term tough? When did they settle into the routine. Especially children who have moved to an academic indie from a state primary- did they keel over in shock at the homework? Would love some wisdom and survival tips for the first term/year transition.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:28 pm 
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I found that for the first week or so, everything was exciting, and then tiredness crept in. However, they soon adapt and you'll be so amazed how soon they mature and grow.

School bag/kit - I always insist that my dc gets his bag ready during the evening. I try to insist that its ready before he relaxes, watches tv etc

Homework - routine helps. My dc always does his after the evening meal.

Travelling - do some practice runs before they start

Independence - if they are not that independent, try and factor in some trips . Eg. Send dc to the local shops by themself (or with a friend), etc


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:31 pm 
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Dd was in the same situation 2012, and has amazed me with transformation regarding self-organisation re. homework, and which books to take (in reality, carries seemingly ALL books for fear of forgetting one and getting in trouble), travelling alone on public bus etc. I did/do nag to get homework done as soon as she's through the door, (while I make dinner), this mainly because of the longer day - the most important thing for us has been trying to stick to an (unpopularly) early bedtime except Fri/Sat - as you said, 1 hour earlier up, 1 hour longer at school, plus travel - if she wasn't in bed by 8 to begin with last September, she would be AWFUL the next day - now this has slipped back a bit to 830/9pm. DD also from state school with 1 or 2 pieces homework per week- the new homework schedule has been hard to swallow, but she has kept up with it all year, by herself. By the way she LOVES the new school and is always singing its praises, which has been a real pleasure - made 3 or 4 good friends, from knowing nobody, so for us it has been a real success story so far - may it continue!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 8:42 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:29 pm
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Independence is a big issue. We've had issues DH and myself both work full time so we had an au pair up until earlier this month which did help re childcare but didn't in terms of developing independence.

We cancelled the aupair, now that DH works from home. DS walks to school alone, and it is his own responsibility to get out of the house on time in the morning (i think we've had an issue this morning when he was glued to his iPad and was late for school - i'm not interfering as i prefer him to get in trouble at school today and learn the lesson). He missed his choir last week (forgot!), so again that was a lesson learnt. But he does take up much more ownership now, and it's noticeable. Also he's SO EXCITED about going to his new indie and counting days that he'd do ANYTING to comply with their quite severe routine.

We'll also be continuing with some mild homework over summer - a) to keep his brain working b) to catch up on some math issues still unresolved by our state primary, so hopefully the arrival of large volume of homework won't come as a shock.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 11:49 am 
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Don't 'baby' him as such, but help him to organise himself. Maybe write out a checklist for each day of the week (once he has his timetable), so that he does not forget his swimming kit etc. And as others have said, pack the bag early, do homework as soon as it is set if possible, learn new vocab in advance and not the night before - all the usual things. Year 7 is about learning to be organised but it does not come naturally to many children. They still need to learn it and often they need our help. My DD was terrible in terms of organisation, but she has learnt, and is still learning.

And maybe the tidiness will have to take a back seat for a while.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:02 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 8:37 pm
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Thank you for your replies. He has some independence already - walks to and from school alone and to shops/friends. He needs to practise the school run on public transport.

So:
homework done on day it's set
pack schoolbag the night before from checklist
bedtime brought forward on school nights

later bedtimes and lie ins at weekends


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 11:03 am
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I think a bit of babying initially is recommended, it is a big change and you dont know what he might have faced during the day. But then once you know he is ok, set up a strict independent routine.


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