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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 12:29 pm 
Given that at this age (especially) girls are more mature, sensible, studious, disciplined do they get the lions share of scholarships?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 12:46 pm 
I would think so. I'm really not sure whether my son should sit papers for mixed schools or if he stand a better chance at a boys school.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 1:03 pm 
Interesting! I would love to know if, in a co-ed school, they have an equal number of scholarships for boys and girls or whether they are simply awarded to the best candidate.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 5:27 pm 
I'll bet that overall boys get more scholarships than girls. This is partly because on average boys' schools will be better endowed than girls' schools, and partly because at the top end I'm not sure girls have much of an edge. On average, of course, girls out-perform boys but at the top of the ability range this may not be so. Certainly in our region boys had a higher pass rate than girls in the county 11+ exams. And no, they didn't get extra marks for being male!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 5:31 pm 
I'll bet that overall boys get more scholarships than girls. This is partly because on average boys' schools will be better endowed than girls' schools, and partly because at the top end I'm not sure girls have much of an edge. On average, of course, girls out-perform boys but at the top of the ability range this may not be so. Certainly in our region boys had a higher pass rate than girls in the county 11+ exams. And no, they didn't get extra marks for being male!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 9:21 pm 
I have been told that, in the past, successful men would bequeath money for scholarships to their old boys' school but that girls' schools don't tend to be funded in this way. Either women don't have the money or they don't care to use it in this way--don't feel the need to be immortalised in this way, perhaps!
At the risk of making myself unpopular with my own sex, the majority of my real top notch pupils have been male!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 8:09 am 
So, boys schools do best for number / size of scholarships, and the competition is, obviously, just between boys.
In mixed schools are there less /less significant scholarships but do the girls get most of them?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 10:37 am 
Jim
I can't answer your question for sure. But I'm guessing not. As others have said above, at the top of the ability range girls do not necessarily outperform boys.

Plus, of course, private schools are not obliged to simply offer scholarships to those children who get the highest marks or seem the most mature at interview. They can balance offers between the genders as they see fit and will generally look at future potential rather than current attainment.

And that doesn't just have to be predicted performance in GCSEs or A levels. Frankly, at an academically strong school pretty much any candidates of scholarship calibre ought to be capable of A*s and As across the board. Top schools are more likely to be trying to spot the illustrious alumni of the future, and in our society most of them are still likely to be male!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 8:27 pm 
Interesting, which of the rich and famous got scholarships? Male v female.


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