Go to navigation
It is currently Sun Dec 04, 2016 8:16 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Independent school query
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 1:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:14 pm
Posts: 14
Hello,

On looking closely at the website of an independent school we are considering in the next few years, it states it would like to move to an aim of "a fully needs-blind admissions process where any bright child can attend the School regardless of their financial situation."

I am just wondering what this might mean - having enough bursaries to not have to turn down bright applicants who otherwise could not afford to attend, or the actual school moving from an independent to becoming state sector provision.

Any views would be useful.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 5:27 pm
Posts: 3445
Location: london
It means the former, being able to admit anyone irrespective of ability to pay through a full bursary programme. However, be warned, there is a HUGE difference between what schools and parents consider to be 'able to pay'. Most schools in my experience will expect both parents to be doing everything they can to work full time and property equity, holidays, spare rooms etc to be given up before bursarial support will be considered. Which, given that many parents will be funding the bursary scheme whilst doing the above to pay their DCs fees seems fair enough really. Good luck.

_________________
mad?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2007 10:30 am
Posts: 505
Location: Warwickshire
'Need blind' is a term used in the US university world. In the case of the university, it means they go through the whole application process without knowing anything about the applicant's income. Offers are made purely on the basis of 'best fit' for the university. For 'need blind' universities this also means 'highly selective' as only 5 such institutions do this now for international students and they include Harvard, Yale and MIT.

The university then commits to giving financial aid to the students they select, allowing them to study for the full undergraduate degree, including food, accommodation, allowance for books, etc. However, the universities concerned have a very detailed means testing process for the student's parents and - as Mad? says - what the parent believes is 'affordable' may be rather different from the universities expectations!

Nevertheless, I think it's a great system as it really allows those with no funds or limited means to get a great university education, which at $65,000+ per year would be well out of reach for many!

I guess the school equivalent would be that the offers would be made to the children they think would thrive best at the school and then parents are asked to complete a bursary application. Presumably the school hopes to meet all the resulting 'need' in the same way as the US universities do. This requires very substantial reserves behind the scenes!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8112
I was just thinking about the financial reserves side of things - the US unis who genuinely do do it have enormous financial reserves, far greater than most schools could manage.

Even then places at US unis still cost a fair bit even with the bursary and some also expect the student to work (on campus owing to visa restrictions) and the earnings are factored in to the calculations.


I agree that many parents having been through the means testing process (for independent schools) will still feel that the sum they have to pay is too high for comfort


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 5:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:14 pm
Posts: 14
Thank you for explaining. It is quite fascinating to hear about what it means.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:43 pm
Posts: 189
It is a step in the right direction.

While there is likely to be a gap between expectations of the School and parents, this scheme can still help in a big way.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 10:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 5922
Isn't it basically getting the richer parents to cover the costs for those who can't afford the fees?

Hey wait :idea: : we could get a national system going like this. We could charge people for schooling and those who hadn't got any money wouldn't have to pay.

We could call it 'state education'.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 10:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 4604
Amber wrote:
Isn't it basically getting the richer parents to cover the costs for those who can't afford the fees?

Hey wait :idea: : we could get a national system going like this. We could charge people for schooling and those who hadn't got any money wouldn't have to pay.

We could call it 'state education'.

:idea: :D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2016 11:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 18, 2014 3:01 pm
Posts: 70
Amber wrote:
Isn't it basically getting the richer parents to cover the costs for those who can't afford the fees?

Hey wait :idea: : we could get a national system going like this. We could charge people for schooling and those who hadn't got any money wouldn't have to pay.

We could call it 'state education'.


THIS IS A WRONG NOTION about the sources of bursary funds. The source isn't necessarily from the pockets of paying parents who themselves are also feeling the pinch of paying the high cost of private education. Though this is probably the case at some struggling private schools, many top independent schools got their bursary funds not from paying parents but from donations of rich and successful alumni, clubs and businesses. Some wealthy alumni who used to be government scholars are also looking back at who they were by helping bright children to get independent education through bursary fund. I know one top independent school with list of individuals and parties who are regular contributors to their bursary fund (not parents) and one of its alumni donated a whooping £1 million in just one go. The assumption that paying parents are the one paying for the bursary children may result to such parents looking down on bursary children or may even think about unfairness of the system specially those who are both parents working and also struggling to make ends met.

_________________
Image "A computer would deserve to be called intelligent if it could deceive a human into believing that it was human."
- Alan Turing


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2016 6:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 5:27 pm
Posts: 3445
Location: london
enigma wrote:
Amber wrote:
Isn't it basically getting the richer parents to cover the costs for those who can't afford the fees?

Hey wait :idea: : we could get a national system going like this. We could charge people for schooling and those who hadn't got any money wouldn't have to pay.

We could call it 'state education'.


THIS IS A WRONG NOTION .


No, it's not.

You are correct that the most substantial funds come from fundraising endowments, largely past parents and alumni, however, in my experience in most indies a percentage of current parents' fees also goes into the bursary pot (2 to 17% that I know of). These are not failing schools, they are some of the most selective London indies who are keen to get as near as possible to needs blind.

enigma wrote:
The assumption that paying parents are the one paying for the bursary children may result to such parents looking down on bursary children or may even think about unfairness of the system specially those who are both parents working and also struggling to make ends met.

That is not what has happened in my experience, other children and their parents are not aware of the level of bursarial support their friends receive. Most paying parents are too busy trying to make ends meet to worry about other people's bursaries. Yes, I'm sure I'd be frustrated if I discovered someone receiving bursarial support who did not at least try to work, or had a spare room they didn't rent out etc, but this is what home visits are for and it is a road to madness for me to waste time trying to second guess how people choose to live their lives and pay for them. Most parents have far better things to do. But let's not pretend that the system is any different from what it is, the most advantaged paying (rightly IMO) for the less so, as Amber says, State Education :D

_________________
mad?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016