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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 7:18 pm 
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My heart sinks for a dear frd who lost his job with son in pvt school. I wonder if anyone can share any info on what happens if families get into financial difficulties. Are the pvt schools sympathetic abt it and offer a breathing space or is it the case of find urself a state secondary?

Will be very greatful for your thoughts as I know my frd is not on this forum and will def benefit from some advise.


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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 7:51 pm 
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I think much depends how wealthy the school is - ie how much it has in funds invested / bursaries finds etc.

I certainly have heard of schools being helpful in these circumstances - not sure how long it would have gone on for as the individuals got new jobs fairly quickly. The crucial thing is that your friend contacts the Bursar ASAP to explain the situation.


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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 7:51 pm 
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I don't think it is possible to make a blanket statement about private schools' attitude in such circumstances, they are probably all different. I came across some posts in the past (not on here) where various solutions were found, including support from some charities set up to help families in such circumstances. I also vaguely remember that in one case school offered support because a child in question was in year 12 or 13. Some schools may offer 'exceptional circumstances' bursaries. I'm sorry I can't offer any more insight, but I think the best place to start would be a meeting with the school (HT or maybea bursar?) and a bit of googling...

(Cross-posted with hermanmunster.)

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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 8:05 pm 
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There is a insurance scheme that covers fees in the event of the main earner losing their job. It is usually payable on the same bill as the fees, the wording fees remissions rings bells. Your friend maybe part of the scheme and if she is it will give them breathing space whilst her DH finds another job / they make plans.

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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 8:18 pm 
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I think the fees remission insurance is if the child is off school ill for a period of time, suspended, or the school closed because of an epidemic, means you can claim the fees back from the insurance company. Redundancy insurance is available but usually an extra.


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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 10:35 pm 
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Thanks Herman, we paid for both :shock: fees remission and insurance against DH losing his job, the premium was very little and was included on the bill, it would be worth them asking/reviewing their bills.

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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 11:51 pm 
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Last time I asked, our school did not offer an insurance scheme against the main earner's unemployment, they said they only had a fee remission scheme covering illness. Thankfully, DS's health is quite robust and he hardly ever misses school at all, so we decided not to sign up for the scheme. When I looked into general unemployment insurance schemes, the premiums I saw were quite high and a lot of conditions/exclusions etc. were attached. Does anyone know of a particular insurer offering school fees cover in an event of unemployment?

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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2016 7:35 am 
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Assuming you accept the idea of fee-paying education in the first place, and that you aren't either minted or funded by someone else / eligible for a bursary, when considering the affordability of fees, ask:

1. Was there was an unused 22k (or thereabouts) after tax hanging around as discretionary income the previous year?
2. Is there enough additional discretionary money available to cover compound inflation at 5-7% every year plus trips, extra curriculars, textbooks, etc.?
3. Could you sustain all of that without blinking for up to 7 years no matter what and still tackle university fees?

If you blink, I think fee-paying is the wrong answer.

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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2016 8:24 am 
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Stroller, reckon that is the ideal and yes the fees go up year on year and it is all paid out of taxed income.

I think sometimes people are hoping that pay will rise, they will get promotions, a premium bond will come up (not £25 ha ha ) or an inheritance will appear from some Great Aunt. Sometimes the choice of indie is because the local schools are just not great, I have lived in areas where the indie day schools were absolutely thriving, there were no GS (nearest was >25 miles) and the comprehensives were not always popular with little choice. Suspect quite a few people were winging it on managing the fees


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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2016 9:17 am 
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Stroller wrote:
Assuming you accept the idea of fee-paying education in the first place, and that you aren't either minted or funded by someone else / eligible for a bursary, when considering the affordability of fees, ask:

1. Was there was an unused 22k (or thereabouts) after tax hanging around as discretionary income the previous year?
2. Is there enough additional discretionary money available to cover compound inflation at 5-7% every year plus trips, extra curriculars, textbooks, etc.?
3. Could you sustain all of that without blinking for up to 7 years no matter what and still tackle university fees?

If you blink, I think fee-paying is the wrong answer.

We're certainly not minted (I wish we were, though) but have managed to pay full fees for the last few years - with some blinking going on at times. :wink: It's a question of personal choice/priorities between holidays abroad etc. and school fees. This is not a discussion I was intending to have, though; my question was simply about if there was an affordable insurance scheme to cover an eventuality of a temporary reduction in family income, as no-one can be sure of anything these days. :)

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