Go to navigation
It is currently Fri Dec 09, 2016 9:41 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:18 pm
Posts: 7
I only found this site a couple of days ago and I think I have read just about everything on it!

Thank you to all the kind parents who give such informative help and advice to others (especially after being unsuccessful themselves in some cases).

My hearing is at the end of Jan and I am preparing my supporting evidence. My son scored 112 & 116 I believe that 116 is the lowest score on which you can appeal, so I already feel downhearted. Especially after reading that someone didn't get through on 120!!!

I am a single mum and my main supporting evidence is that since spring 2006 my son has witnessed unacceptable behaviour while on visits to his father. I have Solicitors letters and replies from his father which prove this. The situation has had an affect on my son and feel this shows in his results. He did have private tutoring and was expected to score around 130.

Does anyone have any idea how this matter will be viewed by the panel and can anyone give me advice on which angle I should take when speaking to the panel?

Many thanks, Gia


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 4:08 pm 
You can appeal on any score - sometimes appeals on 110 are successful, it's all down to the evidence.

Focus on the academic first - Head teacher's recommendation, predicted KS2 NC test levels, high order of suitability -

The other evidence then complements that and will indicate why performance did not match ability.

PS love the user name!


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 4:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 5:26 pm
Posts: 7063
Going it alone wrote:
I believe that 116 is the lowest score on which you can appeal, so I already feel downhearted.

Dear Gia

It's not that 116 is the lowest score on which you can appeal in Bucks. It's just that most of those appeals that do succeed tend to be in the range 116-120.

As a rule of thumb, the further away from 121 you are, the stronger your case needs to be.

Can you demonstrate that the extenuating circumstances affected your son's routine school work? For example, did the summer term report say "There has been an unexpected drop in the standard of work this term ........."?

You then need some solid academic evidence to show that under normal circumstances your son ought to have passed. You will find some suggestions in section B24 here:
http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/11plus ... nswers.php

If the year 5 report was not as good as usual, it would be worth presenting as evidence an earlier report to show how good things were before the extenuating circumstances.

Regards

_________________
Etienne


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 5:06 pm 
Hi Going it alone, I would only like to add that last year i had a succesful appeal on 109 and 116 so just keep going. Just ask if you have any questions

Godd Luck

Guest66


Top
  
 
 Post subject: thanks for your comments
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 8:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:18 pm
Posts: 7
Hi Etienne,

My sons year 5 report was very good, but his teachers made comments about his bad attitude towards adults (a big shock for me) and I wasn't going to include this report to the panel because I thought the teachers comments would go against him. After reading your thoughts on this I think I will, as it shows a change in behaviour at the time of the problems with his father. I hadn't thought of it as proof that he was affected until I read your comments.

Thank you, Gia


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 9:16 pm 
Hi,

If you are presenting it as additional evidence at the Appeal do take six copies with you -


Top
  
 
 Post subject: thanks for advice
PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 2:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:18 pm
Posts: 7
Hi Guest 55

Sorry I haven't logged on for a while so forgive me for not replying sooner. Thanks for the tip about taking 6 copies to the appeal. My date is next week and I am SO nervous. I feel it's so unfair to put the onus on the parent to present the appeal. I am not used to public speaking or making presentations. I understand that the panel will be aware that most parents will be nervous, but I can't help but feel that if 2 cases were similar on paper but one was delivered in a slick and confident way by someone who was used to, say for example, speaking at conferences or meetings. Compared to me with a wobbly voice (only when I'm nervous or embarrassed :oops: - lol), potential to freeze and clam up with fear, and worse of all, not be able to answer a question from the panel. Surely the slick performance would carry more weight, or at least be more persuasive?

I would appreciate ANY comments or advice - I just want this whole ordeal to be over with.

Thanks to anyone who would be kind enough to respond.
Gia


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 2:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 5:26 pm
Posts: 7063
Dear Gia

Rest assured - I don't believe that anyone giving a slick presentation is at an advantage.

Have a look at section B19 and also A9 in the Appeal Q and As (follow the link at the top of the page).

Regards

_________________
Etienne


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016