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PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2011 10:35 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:53 pm
Posts: 19
Hi

I have today had the results of a EP report (BAS II) and would appreciate some feedback before I submit it.

Literacy and Numeracy Skills:

Standard Score Centile Age Equivalent
Number Skills 126 96 18+
Spelling 109 73 14:3
Word Reading 142 99.7 17:3

Composite Scores:

Standard Score Percentile
Verbal Ability 108 70
Non-Verbal Reasoning 137 99.3
Spacial Ability 118 88
General IQ 125 95

I am nervous about including the report. I can see that DS has an innate ability for number skills but is not so great with verbal skills. From what I have read about the BAS II number skills scale is not directly related to school-based curricular experiences and provides the opportunity to challenge the application of knowledge outside of the usual situations. However, I believe that the Literacy Skills Scale relate very closely to the National Literacy Strategy. Can I therefore argue that a low vocabulary score can be down to poor teaching? I intend to use a 'satisfactory' Ofsted report from his primary school which criticises standards reached by the more able pupils in English.


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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 4:44 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 5:26 pm
Posts: 7059
I think literacy and number skills may well differ in the way they relate to the national curriculum, but it may not be an easy argument to put across at the hearing, even if armed with quotations from the internet.

Ideally, what would be best is a letter from the EP confirming this analysis.

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 7:05 pm 
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Thanks Etienne

If a child has an exceptional gift for a particular subject, can they overlook an area where they are not so naturally gifted?
In other words, can a child get in a grammar school by excelling in one subject but with a high IQ.


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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 8:03 pm 
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It's possible, depending on local circumstances, and what sort of view local panels tend to take. In Bucks, for example, where only VR is tested, appeals have sometimes been known to succeed where a child has been shown to have considerable academic strengths in other areas such as maths. On the other hand, this might be a more difficult sort of case to argue in Kent where not only is there an overall qualifying mark, but a minimum score is required in each of VR, NVR and maths.

The interesting thing about your EP report is that, despite a relative weakness in verbal ability, the overall result - the general IQ - was still very good indeed (the 95th percentile).

Generally speaking, when putting an appeal together, I do feel it's important not to focus on extenuating circumstances to the extent where this overshadows evidence of high ability. As a rule of thumb, extenuating circumstances shouldn't take up more than 50% of a case - probably much less ........

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