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 Post subject: BUCKS Appeals
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:36 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
Posts: 2660
Dear All

The day after the results has arrived - some will be elated, some will be bitterly disappointed.

For those who are disappointed - its now time to channel those unwanted feelings into something positive.

I confess I am not an expert on appeals, but I know a fair bit. There may be others out there who have been through the process and can offer advice/give support.

It is not the end of the world - your child may perform exceedingly well in an upper school. If your not happy with that - get that appeal going NOW.

Patricia


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 3:09 pm 
What are the steps involved in a (Bucks) appeal, and is it equally relevant to people from outside the area?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 3:10 pm 
My son got 119 and 118 but we live in Northwood Hills, just outside the area.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 7:14 pm 
Hello Patricia

Just climbed up from the lowly depths of the Wirral site to the heady heights of Bucks.

When considering appeals to any LEA the parents should have good cause to appeal, just because they think their child is bright is not good cause. Likewise if a child has not been prepared properly for the test, as your students have been, that is not good cause.

I am sure that many parents of children who have not passed the test will come up with all sorts of weird and wonderful reasons why their child should be considered for a grammar school place. At the end of the day the majority of children who did not pass are probably not suited to the grammar system that is quite highly academic and requires commitment from both the child and parent.

I am going to relate two honest scenarios that two of my students are faced with at the moment.

Child one, high ability. This child has a sister with Leukemia who is going through the second stages of medication. On the day of the first test the sister developed an infection and was rushed to Alder Hey hospital where she spent four days recovering. The family are going through an unimaginable hard time coping with these circumstances. The headteacher of the childs school has informed the LEA of the circumstances. We are dealing here with a child who on a day to day basis is coping with the life or worse situation of her younger sister.

Child two, medium to high ability. Had a cold at the weekend and was up part of last night with a cough and we do hope that this won't affect her performance on Tuesday.

One of the problems faced by LEAs is the overwhelming number of parents who appeal because of trivial excuses, clutching at straws hoping they can persuade the LEA to offer their child a place. When in fact there are children going through major traumas in their lives, who are coping with the trauma and the eleven plus and are far more deserving of an appeal.

I would suggest that if a child, that does not have specific issues, falls below five points of the entrance mark then they should not consider appealing.

Mike


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 8:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
Posts: 2660
Dear Mike

Agree on the [deserving case senario] However... If school think child should go to grammar - and parents are in support - then you have to try your hardest to get ' what is wanted ' even if it means clutching at straws.

Patricia


Last edited by patricia on Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 8:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
Posts: 2660
Dear Smita

You should have received an information pack with your results letter. The only difference [ I believe ] is that you would have been sent a Headteachers summary form which you must arrange to be completed. If
your head is unable to supply the information - you must make it clear on your appeal form.

The panel needs to know why your child did not perform as well as expected, supported by academic evidence of suitability for grammar school.

If applicable include social, medical or language reasons for not performing.

Language is always a relevant point [ not necessarily to you] because there are many children,where english is not their first language, that should be in grammars but 'failed ' due to their verbal understanding at the age of 11. For this reason- a few years ago Bucks were considering a change to non verbal reasoning.

Have a good look through your information pack [ sometimes needs a second reading!] and most importantly goodluck.

Patricia


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 Post subject: Appeal
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 6:47 am 
I shared my daughter's 11+ Bucks result but she ran into tears to find it is a near miss.She scored 120.I am planning to appeal but I feel her Headteacher will not back us up (the reason being we fell out on certain issues last year in her school and since then I am not someone she ever wants to help or see).I would be most grateful for any advice.Thanks.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 8:56 am 
We could have been in a similar situation, and we had planned that my husband would be the one to go and talk to my son’ head teacher. Anyway, you child’s head may not get on with you, but she is still a professional and she should be able to give an impartial assessment of you daughter. After all, it's her future on the line, not yours.

Best of luck,


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 Post subject: Appeal letters
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 10:23 pm 
Yes---you do have to ask the headteacher but you can also approach the class teacher direct -I used to teach (and be head of year 6) and in the last 5years I've written many appeal letters for children in that year group; if I felt they would benefit from this. If the class teacher will back you with a personal recommendation, this may well add to your apeal - after all they are the ones who know how well your child concentrates and contributes to class work and also how competent they are in class and with homework. I have seen many children go through on appeal - from 109 (dyslexic) to 120 - I also know of 120's not getting through.

I do empathise with what you are going through as I've done this three times so far with my own children - so far all have got through on over 121 - but I honestly have been through this with many parents. Headteachers don't always know your child - especially in a bigger primary school - don't forget the class teacher as they are often able to help.

Dobby


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 Post subject: Appeal
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:43 am 
Dear Cathrine and Dobby

Thanks for your support. I will definately approach one of them.
Naina


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