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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 11:09 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 9:59 pm
Posts: 16
I have an appeal hearing very shortly and would like some advice.

My son gained 110 in the Slough Consortium exams and I requested his raw scores. As a result there was a manual remark, which didn't change his scores, but for which they gave me analysis.
On the Verbal Reasoning paper, the paper for which he missed out by a few marks, he had 9 sequential questions incorrect, apparently within the same section. I'm thinking he read the question wrong, as although they don't say what type, they do say that it largely related to two responses being required for each answer - so possibly opposites or similars.
My question is how do I include this in my evidence, and how do I say this in the best light that would help our case? Or should I not mention? Had he got this section right he would have passed.
Thanks


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 2:09 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
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Location: Buckinghamshire
natural wrote:
On the Verbal Reasoning paper, the paper for which he missed out by a few marks, he had 9 sequential questions incorrect, apparently within the same section. I'm thinking he read the question wrong, as although they don't say what type, they do say that it largely related to two responses being required for each answer - so possibly opposites or similars.
Although I am not familiar with the Slough papers, I fee fairly sure you are right - in Bucks these two question types (opposite and closest meanings) are the downfall of a lot of children, simply because they fall for traps. There will be closest meaning options among the opposites and vice-versa.

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My question is how do I include this in my evidence, and how do I say this in the best light that would help our case? Or should I not mention? Had he got this section right he would have passed.
I would mention it briefly if it appears that he was indeed very sound on all the other questions, but it won't hold water if there were other slip ups.

You can simply say that "it appears to be a single question type that let him down in a moment of confusion". It might elicit some sympathy from the panel, but you do need to concentrate very firmly on demonstrating high academic ability otherwise.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2012 10:56 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 9:59 pm
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Thanks Sally-Anne
Without this forum and advice I certainly wouldn't be able to do this.
Thanks for all the advice


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