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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 1:41 pm 
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Our son did not achieve the pass mark for the grammar school listed as our first preference. He was however, successful in being offered a place at a grammar in a neighbouring county so although we count ourselves lucky, we are considering appealing, particularly as our daughter is already at our 1st choice school.

There seem to be lots of companies specialising in assisting parents with appeals, and they advertise high percentage success rates. Does anyone have experience of using such a company???


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 1:43 pm 
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I saw on another thread somewhere yesterday that this is not usually recommended - I imagine that there is something in the Appeals Q&As.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 1:45 pm 
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http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/appeals/general#a11

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 2:55 pm 
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Hi success rates come from 'cherry picking'. I wouldn't read much in to it and firmly believe that you stand as good a chance by yourself by fully researching the process. Of course if you can afford it then it's personal choice but a parent really does know their child best and can answer any questions more fully than an advisor.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 3:38 pm 
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I agree with Tracy. I don't see how anyone can achieve a high percentage success rate without picking and choosing their cases.

Appeals are very unpredictable. The average success rate (nationally) is around 30%.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 10:21 pm 
The evidence you can gather for the appeal is the crucial matter. The more evidence you have of academic ability the better.

I think you will find everything you need here on this forum.

It would appear to me that you might come across better at an appeal if you present your case yourself rather than bring in a solicitor.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 10:55 pm 
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I'm appealing (DD passed easily but school oversubscribed) and I wouldn't consider using anyone. I think if you do it yourself it is from the heart and noone can get the message across better than a parent.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 11:44 pm 
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I have heard in some cases parents who are appealing take solicitors along on the day of the appeal. I am not sure if this is a good thing or not but could help in some cases where there may have been a slight injustice perceived.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:19 pm 
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I doubt that a solicitor would be needed to deal with a slight injustice.

Just possibly for cases involving very complex legal issues (0.1% of appeals at a guess!).

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 12:42 pm 
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Location: Gloucestershire
Etienne wrote:
I doubt that a solicitor would be needed to deal with a slight injustice.

Just possibly for cases involving very complex legal issues (0.1% of appeals at a guess!).

I've never heard an appeal where a solicitor was there with the parents. I've heard a few where the paperwork was written by a professional appeal company including one where they were meant to attend to help out the parents, but dropped out the day before hand! In that particular case, the parents had a good case, but the professional hadn't actually managed to pick it up or put it in the docs - we got it out of the parents ourselves and they won the appeal - despite having paid.

They have all tended to over-egg the pudding, putting too much evidence in about things that really don't make a great deal of difference, but may make the parents think they've got good value.

Apart from the one aforementioned, none have been successful as far as I can remember, purely because the academic ability wasn't strong and the other appeals were more compelling. They also have a tendancy to try & highlight small sections of a school report - we read the whole thing and note that 'Johnny works hard' may be followed by 'for his ability'...

Finally, these are informal tribunals, designed for people to represent themselves. Solicitors are more used to adversorial court proceedings, and not where the 'opposition' may actually be friendly and sympathetic. Panels may well not take well to agressive presentation & questioning - it could sub-conciously affect their view of your case.

However, if you do have a very, very complex legal point, you may want to take advice - but I would say that's more likely to be needed for a permanent exclusion appeal than a grammar admission appeal.

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