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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:34 pm 
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My son has a recognised disability.

He has no SEN in place for this. I didn't declare it on the application form as I thought it would make little difference to how he sat the exam. An error in judgement on my part. Will this have an impact of pursuing an appeal.

I do worry that people will make judgements based on his disability about his suitability for GS?
I have already sampled this judgement.
Inspite of this he is a high achiever at school. And was expected to do well.

Its very difficult as we have always taught him that his problem is a reason to try harder, not an excuse for not doing well. However it is very likely that his problem may have had a significant influence on his performance.

His doctor and teachers will support an appeal.

How should the doctors letter be formed? Should it state the nature of the condition and how it affects my son. Should it also give regard to the events of the day? Which small to some, are of magnitude to my son.

I have had the exam remarked, there is no difference to the score. I also asked for comment on the legibility of the written content, there was no comment made. How can I find out if this was an issue?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:10 pm 
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Dazel wrote:
He has no SEN in place for this. I didn't declare it on the application form as I thought it would make little difference to how he sat the exam. An error in judgement on my part. Will this have an impact of pursuing an appeal.
Not necessarily, although some admission authorities do make it very clear that they want to be informed of any known extenuating circumstances before the 11+.

Quote:
How should the doctors letter be formed? Should it state the nature of the condition and how it affects my son.
Yes.

Quote:
Should it also give regard to the events of the day?
If it's possible, yes - but only if there is a clear medical basis for what is being said. (A letter stating "Mr. and Mrs. Dazel tell me that their son was not at his best on the day of the 11+" is best avoided! :))

Quote:
I have had the exam remarked, there is no difference to the score. I also asked for comment on the legibility of the written content, there was no comment made. How can I find out if this was an issue?
I'm afraid you have no legal right of access to the paper. If legibility is linked to the disability, then you could tell the appeal panel that you tried to clarify whether this had any bearing on the result, but received no response.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:20 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:37 am
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I have realised the email with further info was bounced back to me. I have tried again.
Although I'm not sure if there is anything else to add to the answers that you have already given.
Thanks for looking.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 2:56 pm 
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Thanks for the background info which came through this time.

Quote:
My son has a recognised disability. He has no SEN in place for this. I didn't declare it on the application form as I thought it would make little difference to how he sat the exam. An error in judgement on my part.
It seems perfectly reasonable to me that you were focusing on the issue of whether any adjustments to the test arrangements would be needed.

Quote:
Will this have an impact of pursuing an appeal.
It shouldn't - although they may well ask why it wasn't mentioned originally, and whether in hindsight any adjustments would have helped.

Quote:
Its very difficult as we have always taught him that his problem is a reason to try harder, not an excuse for not doing well.
I really like that - and I think an appeal panel would appreciate it too.

Quote:
I do worry that people will make judgements based on his disability about his suitability for GS?
Appeal panels are made up of fallible human beings, but I hope they would act properly (and I'm sure the vast majority do). The Appeals Code specifically states that "The admission authority and appeal panel must act in accordance with relevant human rights and equalities legislation, for example, the Equality Act 2010".

There have been a number of threads on the forum about appeals for children with a wide range of disabilities. For example (and I know your son doesn't have all these conditions, but the experience of the parents concerned may be of interest):
viewtopic.php?f=35&t=14003&hilit=tiffin+appeal%3F
viewtopic.php?f=35&t=8297&hilit=definition
viewtopic.php?f=35&t=23397&p=275120&hilit=adhd#p275120

I would advise you to focus on evidence of high ability, and reasons for wanting a place at the school being appealed for - because ultimately that is what will decide the outcome of your appeal.
Apart from answering any questions from the panel, I would let the medical evidence speak for itself.

Do let us know if we can be of any further help. :)

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2012 8:02 am 
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Thank you for the advice. As this will not be until March I have plenty of time to build evidence.
Should I add anything to the SIF on the first application?
Also, if we are offered our second choice school, but choose to appeal the first choice, if the appeal fails have we potentially lost our second choice school as well by failing to accept original offer.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2012 11:59 am 
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Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 5:26 pm
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Dazel wrote:
Should I add anything to the SIF on the first application?
Do you mean reasons for preference? If you have a strong reason (e.g. 'the level of pastoral care'), I would mention it briefly without going into detail.
http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/appeals/general#a27

Quote:
Also, if we are offered our second choice school, but choose to appeal the first choice, if the appeal fails have we potentially lost our second choice school as well by failing to accept original offer.
No - you can accept the original offer, and then withdraw in the event of a successful appeal. :)

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 9:30 pm 
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Well we've filled in the form and picked 3 schools. One being a GS ( which he didn't pass11+ for), another being our catchment school, over subscribed and we are in edge of catchment, our third would be great if we just that bit nearer.
I added a bit of blurb regarding our choices. Good academic environments, and separate science subjects.
I did mention his ADHD, (I hope that this was not wrong), I also mentioned his high level achievements even with his problem.
I mentioned the increased difficulty with transition for him and why the schools we have chosen (transferring peer group and good pastoral care) are most suited.
I hope that This is ok. Is there such a thing as too much information. I work on the assumption that someone will read what I have written........and maybe give it a second thought.


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