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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:03 pm 
Has anybody any experience of appeals against the LA or school's refusal to allow a child to transfer to secondary school a year early (having passed the 11 plus)?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 6:16 pm 
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I don't have direct experience of this. I do know that some schools will move a child up a year before they are the correct age as my son was moved up a year for core subjects when he was only seven. The LA usually have criteria for allowing entrance to the 11+, but if your child was alloewed to sit the actual exam - one would question why this event was allowed to take place if the child would then not be permitted to move a year early to grammar.
Often professional will say that a child may not be emotionally ready to be placed with an older year group even if they are academically suited!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 8:05 pm 
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I've only had experience of the other way round - allowing a child to take 11+ a year late (very exceptional circumstances).

As I understand, a child can take the 11+ early, but if they fail, are not allowed to take it again the following year. But I'm open to correction on this one.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:15 pm 
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I haven't come across this situation before. I wonder whether Guest is talking about a LA 11+, and one of the same LA's grammar schools? Exactly how was the reason for refusal worded?

In my own local authority the problem only arises at the 11+ test stage (not the transfer stage). The LA has specific rules about whether it will allow the 11+ to be taken early (for example, the pupil must have been working for some time in an older class, presumably to demonstrate that he/she can cope socially as well as academically). If early testing is refused, parents have the right of appeal.
If early testing is agreed , and the child is successful, there is no problem transferring to one of the authority's grammar schools (on grounds of age).
If early testing is agreed, and the child is unsuccessful, the situation is as Capers suggests above - the test cannot be taken again the following year.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 4:49 pm 
Thank you for your replies.

How would one counteract a LA assessment that the child was not mature enough for early transfer?


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 5:09 pm 
I would imagine the only way you could counteract would be with strong evidence from your child's school, eg that your child has coped for X years with an older cohort, made friends within that cohort and coped both academically and socially. However, I have taught very able children who are out of year group and, occasionally, although academically coping, maturity wise they are not - usually evident on the playground when they tend to gravitate towards same age children (who occasionally are also being taught out of year).

Sorry, this is probably not much help to you as the LA probably uses the school's report to make a decision about early transfer. The only other argument I can think of if is that your child has been taught with the same older cohort for a few years they will have lost touch socially and academically with their own year group. To not transfer early would mean repeating work, and the upheaval of 'moving down a year' - you could argue that this would cause more damage to your child than an early transfer, irrespective of maturity.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 5:40 pm 
Thank you, Waddle. Those arguments might be relevant. What about Ofsted having said that the school is not meeting the needs of the more able and G&T children? LA say that because of the Ofsted report money and effort will now be put in so the needs will be met.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 6:13 pm 
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Hi again,


I agree with the other replies, but Waddle's suggestion would probably be your strongest case. My son did exactly what the others have said - although placed in a higher year group from aged 7 - he still preferred to paly with the younger children from his own age group.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 8:03 pm 
Is it harder to show a boy is mature than it is for a girl? Social skills are not a strong point but this is across the board with all ages, not just with his class mates.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 1:19 pm 
How much younger is he? Is he has an autumn birthday the social issue is likely to be less obvious as he will only be a few weeks younger than the summer-born Year 7s. If he is summer born himself, he will be nearly two years younger than some of the older Year 7s.

If he's not allowed to move up this year, will his 11+ result still be valid next year or will be need to retake?

Geoffrey


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